Recent changes to this wiki:

added explicit date
diff --git a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
index d8de2d0..955cf0c 100644
--- a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
@@ -1,6 +1,8 @@
 [[!tag 9chris digital west]]
 [[!meta  date="2017-12-08 15:53"]]
 
+December 8, 2017
+
 For [[more than four years|Historical court records from the American West]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
 
 Lately, I have realized that there's a more simplistic factor that helps keep me improving 9CHRIS: the variety of work that is required helps keep upgrades from becoming dull. From the tedious escapism of hand-correcting the records, to the puzzle-solving of deriving meaning from ugly text, to learning about servers, HTML, Markdown, SQLite, and git, to the inspirational feeling of having a senior scholar get in touch about how they have been using it to inform their work, each element of the project requires a different kind of skill and delivers a different sort of reward. I can "play around" with something new, and if it seems to work and there might be promise in it, I can then formalize it as part of the project; but if it ends up being just a curiosity or a dead-end, there was satisfaction in the exploration on its own.

fix bug
diff --git a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
index 5368e29..d8de2d0 100644
--- a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 [[!tag 9chris digital west]]
 [[!meta  date="2017-12-08 15:53"]]
 
-For [[Historical court records from the American West|more than four years]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
+For [[more than four years|Historical court records from the American West]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
 
 Lately, I have realized that there's a more simplistic factor that helps keep me improving 9CHRIS: the variety of work that is required helps keep upgrades from becoming dull. From the tedious escapism of hand-correcting the records, to the puzzle-solving of deriving meaning from ugly text, to learning about servers, HTML, Markdown, SQLite, and git, to the inspirational feeling of having a senior scholar get in touch about how they have been using it to inform their work, each element of the project requires a different kind of skill and delivers a different sort of reward. I can "play around" with something new, and if it seems to work and there might be promise in it, I can then formalize it as part of the project; but if it ends up being just a curiosity or a dead-end, there was satisfaction in the exploration on its own.
 

fix bug
diff --git a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
index d7f162f..5368e29 100644
--- a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 [[!tag 9chris digital west]]
-[[!meta  date="2017-12-08 13:53"]]
+[[!meta  date="2017-12-08 15:53"]]
 
-For [[posts/Historical_court_records_from_the_American_West|more than four years]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
+For [[Historical court records from the American West|more than four years]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
 
 Lately, I have realized that there's a more simplistic factor that helps keep me improving 9CHRIS: the variety of work that is required helps keep upgrades from becoming dull. From the tedious escapism of hand-correcting the records, to the puzzle-solving of deriving meaning from ugly text, to learning about servers, HTML, Markdown, SQLite, and git, to the inspirational feeling of having a senior scholar get in touch about how they have been using it to inform their work, each element of the project requires a different kind of skill and delivers a different sort of reward. I can "play around" with something new, and if it seems to work and there might be promise in it, I can then formalize it as part of the project; but if it ends up being just a curiosity or a dead-end, there was satisfaction in the exploration on its own.
 

new post
diff --git a/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d7f162f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/9CHRIS_and_gradual_improvement.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+[[!tag 9chris digital west]]
+[[!meta  date="2017-12-08 13:53"]]
+
+For [[posts/Historical_court_records_from_the_American_West|more than four years]], I've been working on a digital legal history project called [9CHRIS -- the 9th Circuit Historical Records Index System][9chris]. The potential for historical analysis that comes from having some 40,000 briefs and transcripts available is what keeps me perpetually interested in continuing to improve this project. Each time I open one of the documents, I think of the potential that such rich detail can offer to historians and others studying the West, especially the relationship between western places, western residents, and the law.
+
+Lately, I have realized that there's a more simplistic factor that helps keep me improving 9CHRIS: the variety of work that is required helps keep upgrades from becoming dull. From the tedious escapism of hand-correcting the records, to the puzzle-solving of deriving meaning from ugly text, to learning about servers, HTML, Markdown, SQLite, and git, to the inspirational feeling of having a senior scholar get in touch about how they have been using it to inform their work, each element of the project requires a different kind of skill and delivers a different sort of reward. I can "play around" with something new, and if it seems to work and there might be promise in it, I can then formalize it as part of the project; but if it ends up being just a curiosity or a dead-end, there was satisfaction in the exploration on its own.
+
+Over the last few months, these two threads have come together in a new effort at improving the data. The identification of documents in the first version of 9CHRIS was mostly done by computers, which were largely but not entirely correct. I hand-corrected some of the most egregious examples where the computer guessed wrong, and the system was generally usable as a result. Recently, however, I realized that if the whole dataset could be hand-corrected, it would open a number of possibilities for future use. Other information could be layered atop the corrected data, and this might, in turn, open up prospects for much more interesting analysis. Consequently, I began hand-correcting each of the 3,359 volumes in 9CHRIS, inaugurating a new phase of the project. Beginning with volume 0001, and moving sequentially, I flip through each volume page by page, noting the beginning of each of the documents it contains, and updating the 9CHRIS site with the correct finds. 
+
+Today I passed a milestone, having [corrected volume 1000][v1000]. With each volume I correct, searches improve, errors are removed from the dataset, and I get new ideas about what can be done with all this data once every document has been correctly identified. Once this hand-correcting phase is complete, future project initiatives will construct layers of additional metadata on this foundation. Even before all the corrections are complete, however, the existing system will be gradually improving with each corrected document. 
+
+[9chris]: http://9chris.org
+[v1000]: http://9chris.org/news/First_thousand_volumes_hand_corrected/
\ No newline at end of file

updates
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index d1ef208..4eccfe1 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -3,7 +3,8 @@
 [[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
 
 I'm Eric C. Nystrom, Associate Professor of History in the [College of
-Integrative Science and Arts][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
+Integrative Science and Arts][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu]. With
+Susan E. Gray, I am Co-Director of ASU Public History. Prior to joining
 ASU, I was an Associate Professor in the History Department at the
 [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research focus is the
 history of American engineering and technology, especially late 19th
@@ -24,7 +25,7 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 
     Arizona State University
 
-    7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+    7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 251C
 
     Mesa, AZ 85212
 
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 03d6b65..5e02b14 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -1,8 +1,10 @@
 # Abbreviated C.V.
 
-- Assistant Professor, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, Arizona State University
+- Associate Professor, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, Arizona State University
 
-    Program Head for History, for the Faculty of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication
+    Co-Director of ASU Public History
+
+    Program Coordinator for History, for the Faculty of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication
     
 - Assistant/Associate Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007-2015
 
@@ -22,6 +24,9 @@ University
     Award for the best scholarly book on mining history published
     2013-2014.
 
+- David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," *Nevada Law
+  Journal* 17, no. 2 (2017): 351-370. Authors’ version: <https://ssrn.com/abstract=2864652>
+
 - Eric C. Nystrom and David S. Tanenhaus, "The Future of Digital Legal
   History: No Magic, No Silver Bullets," *American Journal of Legal
   History* 56, no. 1 (March 2016): 139-156. Author’s version:

updated about
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 19c137c..d1ef208 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -2,8 +2,8 @@
 
 [[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
 
-I'm Eric C. Nystrom, a historian in the [College of Letters and
-Sciences][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
+I'm Eric C. Nystrom, Associate Professor of History in the [College of
+Integrative Science and Arts][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
 ASU, I was an Associate Professor in the History Department at the
 [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research focus is the
 history of American engineering and technology, especially late 19th
@@ -21,20 +21,23 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 - **Mailing Address:**
 
     Eric Nystrom
+
     Arizona State University
+
     7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+
     Mesa, AZ 85212
 
 - **Office phone:** 480-727-1031
 
 - **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- asu -dot- edu
 
-- **Twitter:** @HistoryNystrom
+- **Twitter:** [@HistoryNystrom][twitter]
 
 [RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
 
-[mycourses]: http://mycourses.rit.edu
+[ihc]: https://cisa.asu.edu/people/faculty/ihc
 
-[ihc]: https://cls.asu.edu/ihc
+[asu]: http://www.asu.edu
 
-[asu]: http://www.asu.edu
\ No newline at end of file
+[twitter]: https://twitter.com/HistoryNystrom
\ No newline at end of file

calendar update
diff --git a/archives/2017.mdwn b/archives/2017.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..592399b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+[[!calendar type=year year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/01.mdwn b/archives/2017/01.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..2441b7a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/01.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=01 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(01) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/02.mdwn b/archives/2017/02.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e295fbe
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/02.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=02 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(02) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/03.mdwn b/archives/2017/03.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..6c05242
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/03.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=03 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(03) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/04.mdwn b/archives/2017/04.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..76e7c08
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/04.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=04 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(04) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/05.mdwn b/archives/2017/05.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..678f63a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/05.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=05 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(05) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/06.mdwn b/archives/2017/06.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..2887ab6
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/06.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=06 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(06) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/07.mdwn b/archives/2017/07.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0f746b9
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/07.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=07 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(07) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/08.mdwn b/archives/2017/08.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4da2722
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/08.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=08 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(08) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/09.mdwn b/archives/2017/09.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..70f5e1d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/09.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=09 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(09) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/10.mdwn b/archives/2017/10.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..04f5435
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/10.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=10 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(10) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/11.mdwn b/archives/2017/11.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fe53f8d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/11.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=11 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(11) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2017/12.mdwn b/archives/2017/12.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..bb4a435
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2017/12.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=12 year=2017 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(12) and creation_year(2017) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]

add SSRN url
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
index f01bf40..da2a668 100644
--- a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
@@ -2,14 +2,14 @@
 
 Supplemental data for:
 
-David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," *Nevada Law Journal*, vol. 17. Author's version: <http://ssrn.com>
+David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," *Nevada Law Journal*, vol. 17. Author's version: <http://ssrn.com/abstract=2864652>
 
 ## Data and errata
 
 - Shepardize report for *In re Gault* (387 U.S. 1), downloaded from Lexis-Nexis Sept. 16, 2016, HTML version (available upon direct request)
 - [`sheptools`](https://github.com/ericnystrom/sheptools) to transform HTML Shepardize report to TSV
 - [[Errata correction script for 09-16-2016 data (Awk)|pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk]]
-- [[Gault citation data, TAB-separated format|gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv]]
+- Which results in corrected data: [[Gault citation data, TAB-separated format|gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv]]
 - [[Gault Headnotes|headnotes-gault.pdf]] (retyped by Eric Nystrom) Note: can be generated in CSV form using `sheptools`.
 
 ## Scripts to generate figures

updated cv
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 4131a92..03d6b65 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -1,9 +1,14 @@
 # Abbreviated C.V.
 
-- Assistant Professor, College of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University
+- Assistant Professor, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, Arizona State University
+
+    Program Head for History, for the Faculty of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication
+    
 - Assistant/Associate Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007-2015
+
 - Ph.D. (2007), History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, Johns Hopkins
 University
+
 - M.A. (2002), B.A. (2000), History, University of Nevada--Las Vegas
 
 ## Selected Publications
@@ -11,22 +16,40 @@ University
 - <a
   href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">_Seeing
   Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._
-  </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014).
+  </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014; paperback, 2016).
 
     Winner of the Mining History Association’s 2015 Clark C. Spence
     Award for the best scholarly book on mining history published
     2013-2014.
 
+- Eric C. Nystrom and David S. Tanenhaus, "The Future of Digital Legal
+  History: No Magic, No Silver Bullets," *American Journal of Legal
+  History* 56, no. 1 (March 2016): 139-156. Author’s version:
+  <http://ssrn.com/abstract=2701539>
+
+- David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "'Let’s Change the Law’:
+  Arkansas and the Puzzle of Juvenile Justice Reform in the 1990s,"
+  *Law and History Review* 34, no. 4 (Nov. 2016): 957-997.
+  <http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0738248016000341>
+
+- Eric C. Nystrom and David S. Tanenhaus, "Two Humanists Exploring
+  Together: or, A View from the Weeds," *Rechtsgeschichte - Legal
+  History: Journal of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal
+  History* 24 (2016): 339-340. <http://dx.doi.org/10.12946/rg24/339-340>
+
+- Eric Nystrom and Ronald M. James, "Mining and Nevada: An Entwined History," *Nevada
+  Historical Society Quarterly* 57, nos. 3-4 (Fall/Winter 2014): 160-176. \[2015\]
+    
 - "Underground Mine Maps & the Development of the Butte System at the
   Turn of the Twentieth Century," _IA: Journal of the Society for
-  Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\]
+  Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\] <http://www.jstor.org/stable/23757911>
 
     Winner of the Society for Industrial Archeology’s 2015 Robert Vogel
     Prize for best journal article.
 
 - "In the Aftermath of Tragedy: Herschel Wence and the 1925 City Mine
   Disaster, Sullivan Co., Indiana," _Mining History Journal_ 21 (2014):
-  22-29.
+  22-29. <http://mininghistoryassociation.org/Journal/MHJ-v21-2014-Nystrom.pdf>
 
 - "'Brilliant Contingency of Legal Talent and Mining Experts': A
   Tonopah Apex Lawsuit, 1914-1918," _Nevada Historical Society
@@ -39,13 +62,13 @@ University
   World Heritage Site / University of Stirling, 2011), 84-91.  
 
 - "Underground Photography and American Mining Before 1920," _Mining
-  History Journal_ 17 (2010): 103-126. 
+  History Journal_ 17 (2010): 103-126. <http://mininghistoryassociation.org/Journal/MHJ-v17-2010-Nystrom.pdf>
 
     Winner of the Mining History Association's 2010 John M. Townley Award for best journal article.
 
 - "'Without Doubt the Most Accurate': Underground Surveying and the
   Development of Mining Engineering in the Pennsylvania Anthracite
-  Region," _Pennsylvania Legacies_ 9, no. 2 (Nov. 2009): 20-25.
+  Region," _Pennsylvania Legacies_ 9, no. 2 (Nov. 2009): 20-25. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/27765171>
 
 - "A Grand Galaxy of Talent: Lawyers, Experts, and Models in a Tonopah
   Mining Lawsuit, 1914-1918," in _Boomtown History II: Celebration of
@@ -54,7 +77,7 @@ University
 
 - "Miner, Minstrel, Memory: Or, Why the Smithsonian Has Bill Keating's
   Pants," _Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography_ 131, no. 1
-  (Jan.  2007): 81-102.
+  (Jan.  2007): 81-102. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/20093917>
 
 - "Mapping Underground Drifton: The Evolution of Anthracite Mine
   Maps," _Canal History and Technology Proceedings_ 25 (2006): 79-96.
@@ -89,30 +112,27 @@ University
 - [National Council on Public History][ncph]
 - [Western History Association][wha]
 - [Mining History Association][mha]
-- [Organization of American Historians][oah]
 - [Society for Industrial Archeology][sia]
 
-I have served as editor of the [_Mining History News_][newsletter],
-the quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha],
-since 2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I
-am also a council member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's [Research
-Grants Committee][mhagrants] (please apply!).
+I am editor of the book series *Mining and Society*, which I developed
+with the University of Nevada Press. We seek scholarly manuscripts on
+the interplay between mining and societies in all places and time
+periods. For more information, or to discuss a manuscript, please see
+the [series webpage](http://unevadapress.com/books/?view=series&seriesid=6894) or
+contact me directly: <eric.nystrom@asu.edu>.
 
-Since 2009, I have been Vice-Chair of [TEMSIG][temsig], the Technology and
+I served as editor of the [_Mining History News_][newsletter], the
+quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha], from
+2007-2015. I am also a council member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's
+[Research Grants Committee][mhagrants] (please apply!).
+
+Since 2009, I have been involved with [TEMSIG][temsig], the Technology and
 Museums Special Interest Group of the [Society for the History of
 Technology][shot].  Among other duties, I am keeper of the listserv,
 so if you are interested in joining [TEMSIG][temsig], please contact me.
 
-The [National Council on Public History's][ncph] Student Project and
-Graduate Student Travel Award Committee has counted me as a member
-since 2013. Every year the committee awards up to five [$300 grants to
-enable graduate students to travel][ncphawards] to the NCPH Annual
-Meeting, plus a $500 award for the [best public history student
-project][ncphawards]. Please encourage any grad students with relevant
-interests to consider applying!
-
 I have been an actively involved with the [National Susan B. Anthony
-Museum and House][sbah] since 2008 as a member and past of the
+Museum and House][sbah] since 2008 as a member and part of the
 Collections and Education Committee.  I have also served on the
 steering committee for the museum's long range plan, and I joined the
 Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves
@@ -120,6 +140,14 @@ and interprets the longtime Rochester, NY home of famed equal rights
 advocate Susan B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic
 Landmark.
 
+## Digital Tools and Scripts
+
+- *sheptools*: Legal history tools to manipulate downloaded Shepard’s citation data. <https://github.com/ericnystrom/sheptools> (2016)
+
+- *gb*: Command-line gradebook software, powered by Bash and recutils. <https://github.com/ericnystrom/gb> (2016)
+
+- *napptools*: Manipulate census microdata from the North Atlantic Population Project (IPUMS). <https://github.com/ericnystrom/napptools> (2014)
+
 [oah]: http://www.oah.org
 [shot]: http://www.historyoftechnology.org
 [ncph]: http://www.ncph.org
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
index 3bd3ff8..f01bf40 100644
--- a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
@@ -24,14 +24,21 @@ possible.
 
 
 - **Fig. 1**: Script: [[fig1_gault-by-hn.gp]] Data: [[gault-by-hn-pivot.tsv]]
+
 - **Fig. 2**: Script: [[fig2_gault-scotus-dissent-nondissent.gp]] Data: [[gault-scotus-dissentcites.tsv]], [[gault-scotus-NOTdissent.tsv]]
+
 - **Fig. 3**: Script: [[fig3-gault-cites-by-courttype.sh]] Data: [[court-groups-gault.dat]]
+
 - **Figs. 4-7**: Script: [[fig4-5-6-7.sh]] Data: [[hn3.dat]], [[hn6.dat]], [[hn4.dat]], [[hn11.dat]]
 
   Note: in Author's Version, Figs. 4 and 5, and Figs. 6 and 7 were combined together, respectively, using Imagemagick, e.g.:
   `convert fig4_hn3-by-jurisd-group.png fig5_hn6-by-jurisd-group.png +append figs4-5_combo.png`
 
 - **Fig. 8**: Script: [[fig8.sh]] Data: [[juris-group-by-year-pct.dat]]
+
 - **Fig. 9**: Script: [[fig9.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-tot.dat]]
+
 - **Figs. 10-12**: Script: [[fig10-11-12.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-jurisd.dat]], [[dual-juv-pct.dat]]
+
 - **Fig. 13**: Script: [[fig13.sh]] Data: [[pivoted-year-ctlcirc-dualpct.dat]]
+
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index ff2fed2..06ee80d 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -16,7 +16,8 @@ caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America<
 
 [[Teaching]]
 
-[[Recent Comments|comments]]
+<!-- [[Recent Comments|comments]] -->
+[[Data]]
 
 [[Archives]]
 

checked and fixed links
diff --git a/data.mdwn b/data.mdwn
index 0da3ce8..15fa7b8 100644
--- a/data.mdwn
+++ b/data.mdwn
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 # Data
 
-- [[data/pursuing-gault|"Pursuing Gault"]]
+- [["Pursuing Gault"|pursuing-gault]]
 
-- [[data/nvcensus|Nevada Census, 1860-1920]]
+- [[Nevada Census, 1860-1920|nvcensus]]
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
index b6e03c8..3bd3ff8 100644
--- a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
@@ -1,12 +1,12 @@
-# Pursuing Gault
+# Pursuing *Gault*
 
 Supplemental data for:
 
-David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," /Nevada Law Journal/, vol. 17. Author's version: <http://ssrn.com>
+David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," *Nevada Law Journal*, vol. 17. Author's version: <http://ssrn.com>
 
 ## Data and errata
 
-- Shepardize report for /In re Gault/ (387 U.S. 1), downloaded from Lexis-Nexis Sept. 16, 2016, HTML version (available upon direct request)
+- Shepardize report for *In re Gault* (387 U.S. 1), downloaded from Lexis-Nexis Sept. 16, 2016, HTML version (available upon direct request)
 - [`sheptools`](https://github.com/ericnystrom/sheptools) to transform HTML Shepardize report to TSV
 - [[Errata correction script for 09-16-2016 data (Awk)|pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk]]
 - [[Gault citation data, TAB-separated format|gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv]]
@@ -23,13 +23,15 @@ typically call other programs such as
 possible.
 
 
-- *Fig. 1*: Script: [[fig1_gault-by-hn.gp]] Data: [[gault-by-hn-pivot.tsv]]
-- *Fig. 2*: Script: [[fig2_gault-scotus-dissent-nondissent.gp]] Data: [[gault-scotus-dissentcites.tsv]], [[gsult-scotus-NOTdissent.tsv]]
-- *Fig. 3*: Script: [[fig3-gault-cites-by-courttype.sh]] Data: [[court-groups-gault.dat]]
-- *Figs. 4-7*: Script: [[fig4-5-6-7.sh]] Data: [[hn3.dat]], [[hn6.dat]], [[hn4.dat]], [[hn11.dat]]
+- **Fig. 1**: Script: [[fig1_gault-by-hn.gp]] Data: [[gault-by-hn-pivot.tsv]]
+- **Fig. 2**: Script: [[fig2_gault-scotus-dissent-nondissent.gp]] Data: [[gault-scotus-dissentcites.tsv]], [[gault-scotus-NOTdissent.tsv]]
+- **Fig. 3**: Script: [[fig3-gault-cites-by-courttype.sh]] Data: [[court-groups-gault.dat]]
+- **Figs. 4-7**: Script: [[fig4-5-6-7.sh]] Data: [[hn3.dat]], [[hn6.dat]], [[hn4.dat]], [[hn11.dat]]
+
   Note: in Author's Version, Figs. 4 and 5, and Figs. 6 and 7 were combined together, respectively, using Imagemagick, e.g.:
   `convert fig4_hn3-by-jurisd-group.png fig5_hn6-by-jurisd-group.png +append figs4-5_combo.png`
-- *Fig. 8*: Script: [[fig8.sh]] Data: [[juris-group-by-year-pct.dat]]
-- *Fig. 9*: Script: [[fig9.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-tot.dat]]
-- *Figs. 10-12*: Script: [[fig10-11-12.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-jurisd.dat]], [[dual-juv-pct.dat]]
-- *Fig. 13*: Script: [[fig13.sh]] Data: [[pivoted-year-ctlcirc-dualpct.dat]]
+
+- **Fig. 8**: Script: [[fig8.sh]] Data: [[juris-group-by-year-pct.dat]]
+- **Fig. 9**: Script: [[fig9.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-tot.dat]]
+- **Figs. 10-12**: Script: [[fig10-11-12.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-jurisd.dat]], [[dual-juv-pct.dat]]
+- **Fig. 13**: Script: [[fig13.sh]] Data: [[pivoted-year-ctlcirc-dualpct.dat]]

corrected links
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
index 348ef96..b6e03c8 100644
--- a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
@@ -8,9 +8,9 @@ David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," /Nevada Law Journal/,
 
 - Shepardize report for /In re Gault/ (387 U.S. 1), downloaded from Lexis-Nexis Sept. 16, 2016, HTML version (available upon direct request)
 - [`sheptools`](https://github.com/ericnystrom/sheptools) to transform HTML Shepardize report to TSV
-- [[data/pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk|Errata correction script for 09-16-2016 data (Awk)]]
-- [[gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv|Gault citation data, TAB-separated format]]
-- [[headnotes-gault.pdf|Gault Headnotes]] (retyped by Eric Nystrom) Note: can be generated in CSV form using `sheptools`.
+- [[Errata correction script for 09-16-2016 data (Awk)|pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk]]
+- [[Gault citation data, TAB-separated format|gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv]]
+- [[Gault Headnotes|headnotes-gault.pdf]] (retyped by Eric Nystrom) Note: can be generated in CSV form using `sheptools`.
 
 ## Scripts to generate figures
 

Upload data and scripts
diff --git a/data.mdwn b/data.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0da3ce8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/data.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+# Data
+
+- [[data/pursuing-gault|"Pursuing Gault"]]
+
+- [[data/nvcensus|Nevada Census, 1860-1920]]
diff --git a/data/nvcensus.mdwn b/data/nvcensus.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..c0922cd
--- /dev/null
+++ b/data/nvcensus.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+# Nevada Census Microdata
+
+Ronald M. James, Kenneth H. Fliess, and Eric Nystrom, /Nevada Census Microdata, 1860-1920/,
+Harvard Dataverse Network [Distributor], (1991–2014). Current version: v2, released Dec. 31,
+2014. <http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/27218>
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..348ef96
--- /dev/null
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,35 @@
+# Pursuing Gault
+
+Supplemental data for:
+
+David S. Tanenhaus and Eric C. Nystrom, "Pursuing Gault," /Nevada Law Journal/, vol. 17. Author's version: <http://ssrn.com>
+
+## Data and errata
+
+- Shepardize report for /In re Gault/ (387 U.S. 1), downloaded from Lexis-Nexis Sept. 16, 2016, HTML version (available upon direct request)
+- [`sheptools`](https://github.com/ericnystrom/sheptools) to transform HTML Shepardize report to TSV
+- [[data/pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk|Errata correction script for 09-16-2016 data (Awk)]]
+- [[gault-cites-w-errata_09162016.tsv|Gault citation data, TAB-separated format]]
+- [[headnotes-gault.pdf|Gault Headnotes]] (retyped by Eric Nystrom) Note: can be generated in CSV form using `sheptools`.
+
+## Scripts to generate figures
+
+Note: many of these scripts require further processing of the data using
+scripts from `sheptools`, above.  Any transformations needed are noted in
+the script header.  Gnuplot scripts should be invoked directly; Bash scripts
+typically call other programs such as
+[ploticus](http://ploticus.sourceforge.net), Awk, or scripts from
+`sheptools`.  Intermediate-stage data has been made available below when
+possible.
+
+
+- *Fig. 1*: Script: [[fig1_gault-by-hn.gp]] Data: [[gault-by-hn-pivot.tsv]]
+- *Fig. 2*: Script: [[fig2_gault-scotus-dissent-nondissent.gp]] Data: [[gault-scotus-dissentcites.tsv]], [[gsult-scotus-NOTdissent.tsv]]
+- *Fig. 3*: Script: [[fig3-gault-cites-by-courttype.sh]] Data: [[court-groups-gault.dat]]
+- *Figs. 4-7*: Script: [[fig4-5-6-7.sh]] Data: [[hn3.dat]], [[hn6.dat]], [[hn4.dat]], [[hn11.dat]]
+  Note: in Author's Version, Figs. 4 and 5, and Figs. 6 and 7 were combined together, respectively, using Imagemagick, e.g.:
+  `convert fig4_hn3-by-jurisd-group.png fig5_hn6-by-jurisd-group.png +append figs4-5_combo.png`
+- *Fig. 8*: Script: [[fig8.sh]] Data: [[juris-group-by-year-pct.dat]]
+- *Fig. 9*: Script: [[fig9.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-tot.dat]]
+- *Figs. 10-12*: Script: [[fig10-11-12.sh]] Data: [[dual-system-jurisd.dat]], [[dual-juv-pct.dat]]
+- *Fig. 13*: Script: [[fig13.sh]] Data: [[pivoted-year-ctlcirc-dualpct.dat]]
diff --git a/data/pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk b/data/pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk
new file mode 100755
index 0000000..f4ee542
--- /dev/null
+++ b/data/pursuing-gault/ERRATA-gault-cites_09-16-2016.awk
@@ -0,0 +1,522 @@
+#!/usr/bin/awk -f
+#
+# Errata script for Gault citations derived from Shepards
+#
+# By Eric Nystrom, eric.nystrom@asu.edu
+#
+# Version: September 30, 2016
+#    Apply to 9-16-2016 download of Gault shepards
+#    (updated manually from July errata for April 2016 data download)
+#
+# Important notes:
+#
+# - REQUIRES shep2 from July 11, 2016 or later which implements "shepnum" field and also automatically groups "howcited"
+#
+# - Input fields:
+# $1=cited_case $2=shepnum $3=howused $4=title $5=reference $6=jurisdiction $7=year_string $8=year_num $9=headnotes
+#
+# - All driven off "shepnum" cite numbers; if Shepards input changes, numbers will change
+#
+# - When updating, update shepnums even for problems left as-is. Add date for each substantive/interpretive change made.
+#
+# - If no case name, reference should be used as case name, but must
+#   also appear in reference field
+#
+# - if no year available, leave "year_num" and "year_string" BLANK
+
+BEGIN {
+    FS = "\t"
+    OFS = "\t"
+}
+
+# United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 1, 93 S. Ct. 781 Exact same
+# case. (DT, 7-17-2016) Shepnum 50 is "S. Ct." citation, and "Cited";
+# shepnum 55 is U.S. Reports and is "Dissentcite".  Manually
+# investigated by EN 09-24-2016, Gault is cited by Marshall in Dissent
+# at 410 US 1, 34, noting that certain forms of compelled evidence are
+# inherently unreliable, and moreover the constitutional guarantee of
+# non-compelled evidence is a basic principle.
+# Delete 50, keep 55.
+$2 == 50 {
+    next
+}
+
+
+# Ramos v. Town of Vernon, 353 F.3d 171, 331 F.3d 315
+# Exact same case.
+## SAVE 111, remove 112
+$2 == 112 {
+    next
+}
+
+# Hollis v. Smith 571 F.2d 685
+# Duplicate entries: 121 (more info), 122
+$2 == 122 {
+    next
+}
+
+# Jackson v. Conway, 765 F. Supp. 2d 192, 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2156, 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2453
+# The first cite is a magistrate judge’s opinion; the first Lexis cite is a subsequent decision by a higher court (U.S. District Court); the second Lexis cite is to a substituted opinion. (DT 7-17-2016)
+## 140, 141, 142: NO ACTION
+
+
+# Galvin v. New York Racing Ass'n 70 F. Supp. 2d 163
+# Duplicate entries: 152 (more info), 153
+$2 == 153 {
+    next
+}
+
+# Gesicki v. Oswald, 336 F. Supp. 371, 336 F. Supp. 365
+# This case is an August 30, 1971 opinion by Judge Lasker; the second
+# is a December 22, 1971 decision by Circuit Court Judge Kaufman.  We
+# should definitely treat these as separate cites.  (DT 7-17-2016)
+## 195, 196: NO ACTION
+
+# Brown v. Cox, 311 F. Supp. 81, 319 F. Supp. 999
+# Exact same case. 
+## SAVE 339, remove 336
+$2 == 336 {
+    next
+}
+
+# Drummond v. Fulton County Dep't of Family & Children's Services, 547 F.2d 835, 563 F.2d 1200
+# Different decisions—first one is February 2, 1977, and the second is November 28, 1977.  (DT 7-17-2016)
+## 364, 365: NO ACTION
+
+# Drummond v. Fulton County Dep't of Family & Children's Services 547 F.2d 835
+# Duplicates: 364 (HN,cite), 367(DissentCite, no HN)
+
+# Upon further investigation, it is cited in opinion and also in
+# dissent; though in the dissent it says that such a finding under
+# Gault and McKeiver is misplaced.  Therefore, it does not seem to be
+# part of the dissent's reasoning, and it seems like the treatment in
+# 364, with headnote and just "cite", is most applicable.  --EN
+$2 == 367 {
+    next
+}
+
+# Sims v. Engle   619 F.2d 598
+# Duplicate: 418 (cited,HN), 420 (followed, no HN)
+
+# Based on presumption that cited and Followed are similar in our
+# circumstances, save the one with the headnote.  An alternative would
+# be to rewrite 416 to be Followed rather than Cited.
+$2 == 420 {
+    next
+}
+
+#  Bucio v. Sutherland, 674 F. Supp. 2d 882
+# Duplicate entries: 437 (more info), 439
+$2 == 439 {
+    next
+}
+
+# United States ex rel. Ruvalcaba v. Jaimet, 2004 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 22, 2004 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 3723
+# The first is a habeas corpus motion granted in part; the second is the motion denied in part.  It is worth treating these as separate opinions.  (DT 7-17-2016)
+## 523, 524: NO ACTION
+
+
+# Goldstein v. Spears     536 F. Supp. 606
+# Duplicate entries (exactly the same): 540, 541
+$2 == 541 {
+    next
+}
+
+# United States v. Juvenile Male, 595 F.3d 885, 2010 U.S. App. LEXIS 1686, 590 F.3d 924 ;; 581 F.3d 977 (mont 2010), 528 F.3d 1146 (cal, 2008)
+# The first was filed on January 5, 2010, the second one is to a U.S. Supreme Court decision, and third cite is to the same case as the first cite but an amended version (January 26, 2010), which includes Judge Berzon’s concurrence and dissent in part.   (DT 7-17-2016)
+## 613, 615, 617 NO ACTION??  FURTHER INVESTIGATION.
+
+
+
+# Crowe v. County of San Diego, 608 F.3d 406, 2010 U.S. App. LEXIS 894, 593 F.3d 841

(Diff truncated)
cleaned up gault table, added urls
diff --git a/gault/comparison.mdwn b/gault/comparison.mdwn
index f5f8ed6..86ff13b 100644
--- a/gault/comparison.mdwn
+++ b/gault/comparison.mdwn
@@ -8,8 +8,28 @@
   + Cosine similarity, 1-word TFIDF
   + Coside similarity, 3-word TFIDF
 
-
-## Gault vs. all SCOTUS
+- **Click a column name to sort table**
+- Columns:
+  + CLOpin: The courtlistener.com (CL) opinion number for the case compared with *Gault*
+  + Jacc3w: comparison score using 3-word shingles and Jaccard similarity technique
+  + J3Wrank: rank of comparison score (3-word shingles, Jaccard similarity)
+  + Jacc4w: comparison score using 4-word shingles and Jaccard similarity technique (note there are a few unexplainable answers here, might be buggy)
+  + J4Wrank: rank of comparison score (4-word shingles, Jaccard similarity)
+  + Jacc5w: comparison score using 5-word shingles and Jaccard similarity technique
+  + J5Wrank: rank of comparison score (5-word shingles, Jaccard similarity)
+  + COSsim: Cosine similarity score, using one word TFIDF (term frequency weighted by inverse document frequency)
+  + COSrank: rank of Cosine similarity score (one word TFIDF)
+  + COS-3W: Cosine similarity score, using TFIDF on three word shingles
+  + COS3Wrank: rank of Cosine similarity score (TFIDF of three word shingles)
+  + Case: Case title, click for case opinion text (CL)
+  + Ref: Case reference
+  + Year: Year of published decision
+
+- Data:
+  + All data from courtlistener.com; downloaded in bulk June 20, 2016
+  + *Gault* is opinion 107439 in CL data (<a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/107439/in-re-gault/">case text</a>)
+  
+## Gault vs. all SCOTUS (prepared September 23, 2016)
 
 <table class="sortable" border="2" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" rules="groups" frame="hsides">
 
@@ -37,8 +57,6 @@
 
 <col  class="org-right" />
 
-<col  class="org-right" />
-
 <col  class="org-left" />
 
 <col  class="org-left" />
@@ -47,7 +65,6 @@
 </colgroup>
 <thead>
 <tr>
-<th scope="col" class="org-right">Gault</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">CLOpin</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">Jacc3w</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">J3Wrank</th>
@@ -59,14 +76,13 @@
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">COSrank</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">COS-3W</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">COS3Wrank</th>
-<th scope="col" class="org-left">Note</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-left">Case</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-left">Ref</th>
 <th scope="col" class="org-right">Year</th>
 </tr>
 </thead>
 <tbody>
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">108378</td>
 <td class="org-right">.042257</td>
 <td class="org-right">1</td>
@@ -78,13 +94,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">1</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.194877</td>
 <td class="org-right">2</td>
-<td class="org-left">McKeiver v. Pennsylvania</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/108378/mckeiver-v-pennsylvania/">McKeiver v. Pennsylvania</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">403 U.S. 528</td>
 <td class="org-right">1971</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">107191</td>
 <td class="org-right">.035736</td>
 <td class="org-right">2</td>
@@ -96,13 +111,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">2</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.259145</td>
 <td class="org-right">1</td>
-<td class="org-left">Kent v. United States</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/107191/kent-v-united-states/">Kent v. United States</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">383 U.S. 541</td>
 <td class="org-right">1966</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">104491</td>
 <td class="org-right">.034337</td>
 <td class="org-right">3</td>
@@ -114,13 +128,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">58</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0422128</td>
 <td class="org-right">24</td>
-<td class="org-left">Haley v. Ohio</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/104491/haley-v-ohio/">Haley v. Ohio</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">332 U.S. 596</td>
 <td class="org-right">1948</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">107252</td>
 <td class="org-right">.032093</td>
 <td class="org-right">4</td>
@@ -132,13 +145,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">43</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0486839</td>
 <td class="org-right">17</td>
-<td class="org-left">Miranda v. Arizona</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/107252/miranda-v-arizona/">Miranda v. Arizona</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">384 U.S. 436</td>
 <td class="org-right">1966</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">104539</td>
 <td class="org-right">.031575</td>
 <td class="org-right">5</td>
@@ -150,13 +162,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">42</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.049534</td>
 <td class="org-right">16</td>
-<td class="org-left">Bute v. Illinois</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/104539/bute-v-illinois/">Bute v. Illinois</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">333 U.S. 640</td>
 <td class="org-right">1948</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">111198</td>
 <td class="org-right">.031378</td>
 <td class="org-right">6</td>
@@ -168,13 +179,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">4</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0443151</td>
 <td class="org-right">19</td>
-<td class="org-left">Schall v. Martin</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/111198/schall-v-martin/">Schall v. Martin</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">467 U.S. 253</td>
 <td class="org-right">1984</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">108567</td>
 <td class="org-right">.030667</td>
 <td class="org-right">7</td>
@@ -186,13 +196,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">87</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0434406</td>
 <td class="org-right">22</td>
-<td class="org-left">Argersinger v. Hamlin</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/108567/argersinger-v-hamlin/">Argersinger v. Hamlin</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">407 U.S. 25</td>
 <td class="org-right">1972</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">109097</td>
 <td class="org-right">.030659</td>
 <td class="org-right">8</td>
@@ -204,13 +213,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">1724</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0344309</td>
 <td class="org-right">41</td>
-<td class="org-left">Wolff v. McDonnell</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/109097/wolff-v-mcdonnell/">Wolff v. McDonnell</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">418 U.S. 539</td>
 <td class="org-right">1974</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>
 <td class="org-right">108329</td>
 <td class="org-right">.030134</td>
 <td class="org-right">9</td>
@@ -222,13 +230,12 @@
 <td class="org-right">39</td>
 <td class="org-right">0.0374484</td>
 <td class="org-right">33</td>
-<td class="org-left">McGautha v. California</td>
+<td class="org-left"><a href="http://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/108329/mcgautha-v-california/">McGautha v. California</a></td>
 <td class="org-left">402 U.S. 183</td>
 <td class="org-right">1971</td>
 </tr>
 
 <tr>
-<td class="org-right">107439</td>

(Diff truncated)
sort table css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index ebf2c7f..d0a171d 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -12,3 +12,11 @@ margin: 2px;
 	padding: 0px;
 }
 
+/* Sortable tables */
+/* http://www.kryogenix.org/code/browser/sorttable/ */
+table.sortable thead {
+    background-color:#eee;
+    color:#666666;
+    font-weight: bold;
+    cursor: default;
+}

sort table
diff --git a/gault/comparison.mdwn b/gault/comparison.mdwn
index c5e4c65..f5f8ed6 100644
--- a/gault/comparison.mdwn
+++ b/gault/comparison.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<script src="../sorttable.js"></script>
+<script src="../../sorttable.js"></script>
 # Comparison of in re Gault with other cases
 
 - Using techniques:

sort table
diff --git a/gault/comparison.mdwn b/gault/comparison.mdwn
index dcfad86..c5e4c65 100644
--- a/gault/comparison.mdwn
+++ b/gault/comparison.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<script src="sorttable.js"></script>
+<script src="../sorttable.js"></script>
 # Comparison of in re Gault with other cases
 
 - Using techniques:

Merge branch 'master' of ssh://ericnystrom.branchable.com
Conflicts:
about.mdwn
gault comparison
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index a6659d6..be6f5e2 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -2,35 +2,39 @@
 
 [[!img images/nystrom-beard.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
 
-I'm Eric C. Nystrom, an Associate Professor in the History
-Department at the [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research
-focus is the history of American technology, especially late 19th and
-early 20th century mining. I am also interested in Public History and
-the use of open-source digital tools for historical analysis.
+I'm Eric C. Nystrom, a historian in the [College of Letters and
+Sciences][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
+ASU, I was an Associate Professor in the History Department at the
+[Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research focus is the
+history of American engineering and technology, especially late 19th
+and early 20th century mining. I am also interested in public history,
+legal history, and the use of open-source digital tools for historical
+analysis.
 
 On this site you will find blog posts on a variety of historical
 topics, as well as my abbreviated [[CV]], outlines of my [[research]]
 and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
-[contact me](mailto:eric.nystrom@rit.edu).
-
-If you are a student looking for course materials, please log in to [myCourses
-at RIT][mycourses].
+[contact me](mailto:eric.nystrom@asu.edu).
 
 ## Contact Information
 
-- **Mailing Address:**  
-    Eric Nystrom  
-    History Dept., RIT  
-    92 Lomb Memorial Dr., Building 6  
-    Rochester, NY 14623  
-    
-- **Office phone:** 585-475-6172
+- **Mailing Address:**
+
+    Eric Nystrom
+    Arizona State University
+    7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+    Mesa, AZ 85212
 
-- **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- rit -dot- edu
+- **Office phone:** 480-727-1031
+
+- **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- asu -dot- edu
 
 - **Twitter:** @HistoryNystrom
 
-   [RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
+[RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
+
+[mycourses]: http://mycourses.rit.edu
 
-   [mycourses]: http://mycourses.rit.edu
+[ihc]: https://cls.asu.edu/ihc
 
+[asu]: http://www.asu.edu
\ No newline at end of file
diff --git a/gault.mdwn b/gault.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..8dd9764
--- /dev/null
+++ b/gault.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+# Stuff for in re Gault project
+
+- [[Comparison of *Gault* text vs. other SCOTUS decision texts|gault/comparison]]
+
+Far more to say here.
diff --git a/gault/comparison.mdwn b/gault/comparison.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..dcfad86
--- /dev/null
+++ b/gault/comparison.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,482 @@
+<script src="sorttable.js"></script>
+# Comparison of in re Gault with other cases
+
+- Using techniques:
+  + Jaccard similarity, 3 word shingles
+  + Jaccard similarity, 4 word shingles
+  + Jaccard similarity, 5 word shingles
+  + Cosine similarity, 1-word TFIDF
+  + Coside similarity, 3-word TFIDF
+
+
+## Gault vs. all SCOTUS
+
+<table class="sortable" border="2" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" rules="groups" frame="hsides">
+
+
+<colgroup>
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+
+<col  class="org-left" />
+
+<col  class="org-left" />
+
+<col  class="org-right" />
+</colgroup>
+<thead>
+<tr>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">Gault</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">CLOpin</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">Jacc3w</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">J3Wrank</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">Jacc4w</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">J4Wrank</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">Jacc5w</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">J5Wrank</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">COSsim</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">COSrank</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">COS-3W</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">COS3Wrank</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-left">Note</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-left">Ref</th>
+<th scope="col" class="org-right">Year</th>
+</tr>
+</thead>
+<tbody>
+<tr>
+<td class="org-right">107439</td>
+<td class="org-right">108378</td>
+<td class="org-right">.042257</td>
+<td class="org-right">1</td>
+<td class="org-right">.019743</td>
+<td class="org-right">1</td>
+<td class="org-right">.013183</td>
+<td class="org-right">1</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.875376</td>
+<td class="org-right">1</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.194877</td>
+<td class="org-right">2</td>
+<td class="org-left">McKeiver v. Pennsylvania</td>
+<td class="org-left">403 U.S. 528</td>
+<td class="org-right">1971</td>
+</tr>
+
+<tr>
+<td class="org-right">107439</td>
+<td class="org-right">107191</td>
+<td class="org-right">.035736</td>
+<td class="org-right">2</td>
+<td class="org-right">.015941</td>
+<td class="org-right">3</td>
+<td class="org-right">.009861</td>
+<td class="org-right">4</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.826906</td>
+<td class="org-right">2</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.259145</td>
+<td class="org-right">1</td>
+<td class="org-left">Kent v. United States</td>
+<td class="org-left">383 U.S. 541</td>
+<td class="org-right">1966</td>
+</tr>
+
+<tr>
+<td class="org-right">107439</td>
+<td class="org-right">104491</td>
+<td class="org-right">.034337</td>
+<td class="org-right">3</td>
+<td class="org-right">.016175</td>
+<td class="org-right">2</td>
+<td class="org-right">.012175</td>
+<td class="org-right">2</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.372274</td>
+<td class="org-right">58</td>
+<td class="org-right">0.0422128</td>
+<td class="org-right">24</td>
+<td class="org-left">Haley v. Ohio</td>
+<td class="org-left">332 U.S. 596</td>
+<td class="org-right">1948</td>

(Diff truncated)
create initial page
diff --git a/poly/links.mdwn b/poly/links.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d74a37f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/poly/links.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,9 @@
+# External links relating to Williams AFB / ASU Polytechnic
+
+Focusing specifically on Williams AFB history and the built environment of the campus.
+
+- [Online archive in works for Williams Air Force Base at Chandler-Gilbert college (azcentral.com](http://archive.azcentral.com/community/gilbert/articles/20131224online-archive-works-williams-air-force-base-chandler-gilbert-community-college.html)
+
+- [Williams AFB in ChandlerpediA](http://www.chandlerpedia.org/Browse_ChandlerpediA/Places/Williams_Air_Force_Base)
+
+- [Williams AFB on military.wikia.com](http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Williams_Air_Force_Base)

create page, record years with relevant imagery, paragraph of small housing tidbit.
diff --git a/poly/aerialphotos.mdwn b/poly/aerialphotos.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..1da757e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/poly/aerialphotos.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,39 @@
+# Aerial Photography of Williams AFB / ASU Poly
+
+Maricopa County has a surprisingly nice GIS resource available to the public, of aerial photography in the Valley.  Williams/ASU-Poly appear in some, though not all, of that imagery. The site is available here:
+
+<http://gis.maricopa.gov/MapApp/GIO/AerialHistorical/index.html>
+
+The base/campus area appear in the following sets of images:
+
+- 1937 (Jan.-Dec.) -- *note:* base had not yet been constructed
+- 1949 (Feb.-April)
+- 1953 (Mar.-May) -- dark, with relatively poor resolution compared to the others
+- 1976 (Feb.-Apr.)
+- 1979 (Dec.) -- partial, cuts off southern portion of base
+- 1986 (Jan.-Dec.)
+- 1993 (Jan.-Feb.)
+- 1996-1997 (Dec. 1996-Jan. 1997)
+- 1998-1999 (Dec. 1998-Oct. 1999)
+- 2000 (Jan.-Apr.)
+- 2000-2001 (Dec. 2000-Mar. 2001)
+- 2001-2002 (Dec.-Feb.)
+- 2002 (Dec.)
+- 2003-2004 (Dec.-Jan.)
+- 2004 (Nov.-Dec.)
+- 2006 (Jan.-Feb.)
+- 2006 (Oct.-Nov.)
+- 2007 (Jun.-Jul.)
+- 2007-2008 (Oct.-Jan.)
+- 2008 (Oct.-Dec)
+- 2009 (May-Jun.)
+- 2009 (Oct.-Nov.)
+- 2010 (Jun.-Sep.)
+- 2010 (Sep.-Oct.)
+- 2011 (Sep.-Oct.)
+- 2012 (Oct.-Dec.)
+- 2013 (Sep.-Nov.)
+
+In 1949, the base would presumably be much as it was during its initial World War II years; the heart of today's campus has seen substantial change since then, but several buildings remain from that period, and the grid of streets -- now represented by sidewalks -- still patterns campus development.
+
+Housing offers an interesting example of continuity and change. In the 1949 photo, a cluster of houses can be seen south of the present heart of campus, in an area bounded roughly by Avery, Union, Clearview, and Upton Streets. Present-day Upton Street in this area seems to have been a common grassy area. In the 1953 set, these World War II-era houses are joined by development in the area that is today called "South Desert Village," though it is unclear whether the South Desert Village homes were all actually constructed at this time. The older housing persists through 1976, 1979, and 1986 photos, but are apparently gone by 1993 when the base is closed. At that time, however, what appears to be mature landscaping from the former houses seems to have been left in place temporarily. The Korean War-era housing of South Desert Village remains in use today as student housing.

initial page
diff --git a/poly.mdwn b/poly.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e9bad02
--- /dev/null
+++ b/poly.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,9 @@
+# Notes about the public history of ASU's Polytechnic campus
+
+With the beginning of World War II, a large tract of Arizona desert east of Phoenix was transformed into Williams Field by the United States Army Air Corps. Built to train pilots, the base remained open after World War II, and was in use continuously for more than 50 years. A 1991 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) decision slated Williams for closure in 1993. The airport facility was placed into service for general aviation as [Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport](http://www.phxmesagateway.org/), and most of the rest of the base facility was repurposed for higher education -- including the opening of ASU-East in 1996, which was renamed ASU Polytechnic in 2005.
+
+- [[Aerial Photography|aerialphotos]]
+- [[Buildings]]
+- [[Traces of Williams on ASU's campus|traces]]
+- [[Links]]
+

rework book desciptions, add Poly campus history link
diff --git a/research.mdwn b/research.mdwn
index 3583250..8771891 100644
--- a/research.mdwn
+++ b/research.mdwn
@@ -4,13 +4,12 @@
 composite map showing Chollar and Potosi workings, Virginia City, Nevada (1870)"]]
 
 I am interested in the history of technology, particularly those
-histories at the intersection of visual culture and work. In
-particular, I study the development and use of visual tools such as
-underground maps, photographs, and 3-D models by American mining
+histories at the intersection of visual culture and work. In my book *[Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America](http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS)*, I explore the development and use of visual tools such as
+underground maps and 3-D models by American mining
 engineers in the late 19th and early 20th century. These visual tools
 helped mining engineers exercise their authority over work, and
 together with new technologies, enabled them to shape and reshape
-mining labor and the mining landscape.
+mining labor and the mining landscape. 
 
 The image to the right shows a small detail from a published version
 of one of these underground maps (_Atlas Accompanying Volume III on
@@ -20,14 +19,14 @@ represent excavated workings, with different tints portraying
 differences in depth.  In a composite horizontal view such as this,
 blank spots on the map represent unexplored rock.
 
-I'm also intrigued by the history of how the mining industry has been
-portrayed and remembered in museums over the last century,
-particularly at the Smithsonian Institution.
+My next book project combines my interests in mining history and public history, to explore how the mining industry has been
+portrayed and remembered in museums over the last century, particularly at the Smithsonian Institution.
 
 Other areas of scholarly interest include the history of mining in
 both an American and global context; American engineering practice,
-tools, and education in the 1850-1930 period; the use of open-source
+tools, and education in the 1850-1930 period; public history; digital history, particularly the use of open-source
 digital tools to gain new historical insights; the history of the
 American West; the history of National Parks; the history of museums;
 the intersections of material culture and history; and the
-interpretation and reinterpretation of Las Vegas.
+interpretation and reinterpretation of Las Vegas. On this site, I am also collecting notes about the [[public history of 
+ASU's Polytechnic campus|poly]], which was once Williams Air Force Base.

Added a comment: cheat sheet!
diff --git a/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making/comment_1_346aba2d9eddeb309babdb73221555f2._comment b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making/comment_1_346aba2d9eddeb309babdb73221555f2._comment
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..71caf92
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making/comment_1_346aba2d9eddeb309babdb73221555f2._comment
@@ -0,0 +1,8 @@
+[[!comment format=mdwn
+ username="pike702@66b54dd2970a9834c35c44295a2969197641942c"
+ nickname="pike702"
+ subject="cheat sheet!"
+ date="2016-04-14T12:10:11Z"
+ content="""
+Did I tell you about this method? I have done this since I began teaching. Learned it from Dr. Ervine Crawford! I think your statistical analysis is correct in pointing out that there is a correlation between using one and achievement but I think you are also correct in bringing up that it could be that those with developed study habits may be the beneficiaries because those habits would be present whether you allowed it or not. Personally, at the high school level, I may have had more influence to get more of the students to complete the activity. Nice to see!
+"""]]

added Rochester 1885 map, tiled, originally from urban transition project
diff --git a/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.kml b/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.kml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..3370046
--- /dev/null
+++ b/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.kml
@@ -0,0 +1,121 @@
+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
+    <kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
+      <Document>
+        <name>10/582/757.kml</name>
+        <description></description>
+        <Style>
+          <ListStyle id="hideChildren">
+            <listItemType>checkHideChildren</listItemType>
+          </ListStyle>
+        </Style>
+        <Region>
+          <LatLonAltBox>
+            <north>43.24218750000000</north>
+            <south>43.06640625000000</south>
+            <east>-77.51953125000000</east>
+            <west>-77.69531250000000</west>
+          </LatLonAltBox>
+          <Lod>
+            <minLodPixels>128</minLodPixels>
+            <maxLodPixels>2048</maxLodPixels>
+          </Lod>
+        </Region>
+        <GroundOverlay>
+          <drawOrder>20</drawOrder>
+          <Icon>
+            <href>757.png</href>
+          </Icon>
+          <LatLonBox>
+            <north>43.24218750000000</north>
+            <south>43.06640625000000</south>
+            <east>-77.51953125000000</east>
+            <west>-77.69531250000000</west>
+          </LatLonBox>
+        </GroundOverlay>
+    
+        <NetworkLink>
+          <name>11/1164/1514.png</name>
+          <Region>
+            <LatLonAltBox>
+              <north>43.15429687500000</north>
+              <south>43.06640625000000</south>
+              <east>-77.60742187500000</east>
+              <west>-77.69531250000000</west>
+            </LatLonAltBox>
+            <Lod>
+              <minLodPixels>128</minLodPixels>
+              <maxLodPixels>-1</maxLodPixels>
+            </Lod>
+          </Region>
+          <Link>
+            <href>../../11/1164/1514.kml</href>
+            <viewRefreshMode>onRegion</viewRefreshMode>
+            <viewFormat/>
+          </Link>
+        </NetworkLink>
+    
+        <NetworkLink>
+          <name>11/1165/1514.png</name>
+          <Region>
+            <LatLonAltBox>
+              <north>43.15429687500000</north>
+              <south>43.06640625000000</south>
+              <east>-77.51953125000000</east>
+              <west>-77.60742187500000</west>
+            </LatLonAltBox>
+            <Lod>
+              <minLodPixels>128</minLodPixels>
+              <maxLodPixels>-1</maxLodPixels>
+            </Lod>
+          </Region>
+          <Link>
+            <href>../../11/1165/1514.kml</href>
+            <viewRefreshMode>onRegion</viewRefreshMode>
+            <viewFormat/>
+          </Link>
+        </NetworkLink>
+    
+        <NetworkLink>
+          <name>11/1164/1515.png</name>
+          <Region>
+            <LatLonAltBox>
+              <north>43.24218750000000</north>
+              <south>43.15429687500000</south>
+              <east>-77.60742187500000</east>
+              <west>-77.69531250000000</west>
+            </LatLonAltBox>
+            <Lod>
+              <minLodPixels>128</minLodPixels>
+              <maxLodPixels>-1</maxLodPixels>
+            </Lod>
+          </Region>
+          <Link>
+            <href>../../11/1164/1515.kml</href>
+            <viewRefreshMode>onRegion</viewRefreshMode>
+            <viewFormat/>
+          </Link>
+        </NetworkLink>
+    
+        <NetworkLink>
+          <name>11/1165/1515.png</name>
+          <Region>
+            <LatLonAltBox>
+              <north>43.24218750000000</north>
+              <south>43.15429687500000</south>
+              <east>-77.51953125000000</east>
+              <west>-77.60742187500000</west>
+            </LatLonAltBox>
+            <Lod>
+              <minLodPixels>128</minLodPixels>
+              <maxLodPixels>-1</maxLodPixels>
+            </Lod>
+          </Region>
+          <Link>
+            <href>../../11/1165/1515.kml</href>
+            <viewRefreshMode>onRegion</viewRefreshMode>
+            <viewFormat/>
+          </Link>
+        </NetworkLink>
+          </Document>
+    </kml>
+    
\ No newline at end of file
diff --git a/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.png b/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.png
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9dc4772
Binary files /dev/null and b/images/maps/Rochester18851/10/582/757.png differ
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new file mode 100644
index 0000000..2f5bdd1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/images/maps/Rochester18851/11/1164/1514.kml
@@ -0,0 +1,79 @@
+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
+    <kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
+      <Document>
+        <name>11/1164/1514.kml</name>
+        <description></description>
+        <Style>
+          <ListStyle id="hideChildren">
+            <listItemType>checkHideChildren</listItemType>
+          </ListStyle>
+        </Style>
+        <Region>
+          <LatLonAltBox>
+            <north>43.15429687500000</north>
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+            <viewRefreshMode>onRegion</viewRefreshMode>
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(Diff truncated)
calendar update
diff --git a/archives/2016.mdwn b/archives/2016.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..ceb79b8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+[[!calendar type=year year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/01.mdwn b/archives/2016/01.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..69e4612
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/01.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=01 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(01) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/02.mdwn b/archives/2016/02.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..359afa3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/02.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=02 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(02) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/03.mdwn b/archives/2016/03.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0c1dce2
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/03.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=03 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(03) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/04.mdwn b/archives/2016/04.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d744e37
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/04.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=04 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(04) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/05.mdwn b/archives/2016/05.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..2ab7ec1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/05.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=05 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(05) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/06.mdwn b/archives/2016/06.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..08f3c8e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/06.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=06 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(06) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/07.mdwn b/archives/2016/07.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..16e56ef
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/07.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=07 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(07) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/08.mdwn b/archives/2016/08.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..ed1d4b4
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/08.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=08 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(08) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/09.mdwn b/archives/2016/09.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d9c34fd
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/09.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=09 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(09) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/10.mdwn b/archives/2016/10.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..bf00469
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/10.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=10 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(10) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/11.mdwn b/archives/2016/11.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..611c2e4
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/11.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=11 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(11) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2016/12.mdwn b/archives/2016/12.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..a374294
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2016/12.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=12 year=2016 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(12) and creation_year(2016) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]

diff --git a/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn b/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn
index f392b85..23e3c99 100644
--- a/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ WHY LEGAL HISTORY?
 
 THE SOURCES
 
-SEARCH TECHNIQUES
+SEARCH TECHNIQUES -- multiple possibilities
 
 FUTURE PROMISE
 

fixed link
diff --git a/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn
index f735391..93c66c2 100644
--- a/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 This is a short post about teaching.
 
 In a lower-level general education history course I am teaching this
-semester at [[ASU|asucls]], I encourage students to make a small
+semester at [ASU](http://cls.asu.edu), I encourage students to make a small
 handwritten study sheet (a.k.a. "crib sheet" or "cheat sheet") to use
 in class while taking each exam, to jog their memories, help them
 better marshal specific evidence to use in their answers, and reduce
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ Performance on Different Exam Types in Introductory Psychology,"
 e-Learning* 3, no. 1 (February 2013): 1-6, DOI:
 10.7763/IJEEEE.2013.V3.183. 
 
-[^notcoding] Some research suggests that crib sheets do not
+[^notcoding]: Some research suggests that crib sheets do not
 effectively help students learn the material; see Thomas N. Dorsel and
 Gary W. Cundiff, "The Cheat-Sheet: Efficient Coding Device or
 Indispensable Crutch?" *The Journal of Experimental Education* 48,
@@ -73,4 +73,3 @@ questions, the essay questions, or both. But in any case the outcome
 is clear enough to me to continue to encourage students to make a
 study sheet when they have an opportunity to do so.
 
-[asucls]: http://cls.asu.edu

creating tag page tags/teaching
diff --git a/tags/teaching.mdwn b/tags/teaching.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5017ca7
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/teaching.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged teaching"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(teaching)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

new post on teaching ; fix photo
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index b5d9545..df30286 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 # About Me
 
-[[!img images/nystrom-beard.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
+[[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
 
 I'm Eric C. Nystrom, a historian in the [College of Letters and
 Sciences][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
diff --git a/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..f735391
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Study_sheets_are_worth_making.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+[[!tag teaching]]
+[[!meta  date="2015-11-14 11:53"]]
+
+This is a short post about teaching.
+
+In a lower-level general education history course I am teaching this
+semester at [[ASU|asucls]], I encourage students to make a small
+handwritten study sheet (a.k.a. "crib sheet" or "cheat sheet") to use
+in class while taking each exam, to jog their memories, help them
+better marshal specific evidence to use in their answers, and reduce
+exam anxiety.[^cribsheets] I also hoped the process of preparing the
+handwritten sheet would be a valuable study exercise, encouraging them
+to comprehensively scan the material as they looked for facts to
+include, and reinforcing key concepts by writing them on the
+sheet.[^notcoding]
+
+[^cribsheets]: The literature on the effectiveness of study sheets is
+generally positive, though few researchers attribute major performance
+gains to them.  See for example Brigitte Erbe, "Reducing Test Anxiety
+While Increasing Learning: The Cheat Sheet, *College Teaching* 55,
+no. 3 (2007): 96-98, DOI: 10.3200/CTCH.55.3.96-98; and Afshin Gharib
+and William Phillips, "Test Anxiety, Student Preferences and
+Performance on Different Exam Types in Introductory Psychology,"
+*International Journal of e-Education, e-Business, e-Management and
+e-Learning* 3, no. 1 (February 2013): 1-6, DOI:
+10.7763/IJEEEE.2013.V3.183. 
+
+[^notcoding] Some research suggests that crib sheets do not
+effectively help students learn the material; see Thomas N. Dorsel and
+Gary W. Cundiff, "The Cheat-Sheet: Efficient Coding Device or
+Indispensable Crutch?" *The Journal of Experimental Education* 48,
+no. 1 (Fall 1979): 39-42.  These authors, both psychologists,
+determined this by asking students to prepare crib sheets before a
+short, voluntary exam. The professors then took the sheets away from
+some students. The students without cheat sheets then did not do as
+well on the test as those who got to use the sheet they had prepared,
+showing that the crib sheets functioned as a "crutch" but not a device
+that had helped students internalize information during pre-test
+studying. The applicability of this study to longer, mandatory exams
+is not clear; also unreported is whether any student wished to bop the
+researchers on the nose.
+
+When the day of the midterm exam arrived, I was surprised to see that
+not all students had made study sheets. In fact, only 15 out of 24
+students (62.5%) made them.  I collected the sheets with the exams,
+and later, when recording my grades, I noted whether or not each
+student had made a study sheet, so I could see if creating a sheet
+made a difference in their performance on the midterm.
+
+| sheet        | students |  mean (of 40) | std dev | mean (pct) |
+|---------|----------|-------|---------|------------|
+| With    |       15 | 32.93 |    2.62 |      82.3% |
+| Without |        9 | 28.50 |    6.47 |      71.3% |
+
+
+Perhaps unsurprisingly, each group showed a range of outcomes. In
+general, those who made the sheets did better on the exam than those
+who did not -- the average score was 9% higher for those with study
+sheets. No study sheet user received a grade below a mid-C. For those
+students without study sheets, the range was greater, spanning failing
+grades all the way to a couple of As. (The exam was worth 40 points;
+the final table column adjusts the mean scores to a percentage basis.)
+
+This is of course a very small set of results, doubtlessly showing the
+influence of more factors than the single issue of having a crib sheet
+or not which I've examined here. It seems quite possible, for
+instance, that some students who didn't make a study sheet also didn't
+study comprehensively for the exam, which would mean use of a study
+sheet might simply be a marker of students with better study
+habits. The data is not fine-grained enough to see if the improvement
+for crib sheet users was seen in the multiple choice/short answer
+questions, the essay questions, or both. But in any case the outcome
+is clear enough to me to continue to encourage students to make a
+study sheet when they have an opportunity to do so.
+
+[asucls]: http://cls.asu.edu

address spacing
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 6c8b63a..b5d9545 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -21,8 +21,11 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 - **Mailing Address:**
 
 	Eric Nystrom
+
 	Arizona State University
+
 	7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+
 	Mesa, AZ 85212
 
 - **Office phone:** 480-727-1031

address spacing
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 3f0700a..6c8b63a 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -19,6 +19,7 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 ## Contact Information
 
 - **Mailing Address:**
+
 	Eric Nystrom
 	Arizona State University
 	7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N

address spacing
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index f598289..3f0700a 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -19,10 +19,10 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 ## Contact Information
 
 - **Mailing Address:**
-    Eric Nystrom
-    Arizona State University
-    7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
-    Mesa, AZ 85212
+	Eric Nystrom
+	Arizona State University
+	7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+	Mesa, AZ 85212
 
 - **Office phone:** 480-727-1031
 

address spacing
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index a89686d..f598289 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -19,13 +19,9 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 ## Contact Information
 
 - **Mailing Address:**
-
     Eric Nystrom
-
     Arizona State University
-
     7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
-
     Mesa, AZ 85212
 
 - **Office phone:** 480-727-1031

address spacing
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index be6f5e2..a89686d 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -21,8 +21,11 @@ and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
 - **Mailing Address:**
 
     Eric Nystrom
+
     Arizona State University
+
     7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+
     Mesa, AZ 85212
 
 - **Office phone:** 480-727-1031

Updated to reflect move to ASU
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 330c686..be6f5e2 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -1,36 +1,40 @@
 # About Me
 
-[[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=270x270]]
+[[!img images/nystrom-beard.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
 
-I'm Eric C. Nystrom, an Associate Professor in the History
-Department at the [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research
-focus is the history of American technology, especially late 19th and
-early 20th century mining. I am also interested in Public History and
-the use of open-source digital tools for historical analysis.
+I'm Eric C. Nystrom, a historian in the [College of Letters and
+Sciences][ihc] at [Arizona State University][asu].  Prior to joining
+ASU, I was an Associate Professor in the History Department at the
+[Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research focus is the
+history of American engineering and technology, especially late 19th
+and early 20th century mining. I am also interested in public history,
+legal history, and the use of open-source digital tools for historical
+analysis.
 
 On this site you will find blog posts on a variety of historical
 topics, as well as my abbreviated [[CV]], outlines of my [[research]]
 and [[teaching]], and details about the [[site]].  Please feel free to
-[contact me](mailto:eric.nystrom@rit.edu).
-
-If you are a student looking for course materials, please log in to [myCourses
-at RIT][mycourses].
+[contact me](mailto:eric.nystrom@asu.edu).
 
 ## Contact Information
 
-- **Mailing Address:**  
-    Eric Nystrom  
-    History Dept., RIT  
-    92 Lomb Memorial Dr., Building 6  
-    Rochester, NY 14623  
-    
-- **Office phone:** 585-475-6172
+- **Mailing Address:**
+
+    Eric Nystrom
+    Arizona State University
+    7271 E. Sonoran Arroyo Mall, Suite 233N
+    Mesa, AZ 85212
+
+- **Office phone:** 480-727-1031
+
+- **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- asu -dot- edu
 
-- **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- rit -dot- edu
+- **Twitter:** @HistoryNystrom
 
-- **Twitter:** [@HistoryNystrom](https://twitter.com/HistoryNystrom)
+[RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
 
-   [RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
+[mycourses]: http://mycourses.rit.edu
 
-   [mycourses]: http://mycourses.rit.edu
+[ihc]: https://cls.asu.edu/ihc
 
+[asu]: http://www.asu.edu
\ No newline at end of file
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 4819369..4131a92 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -1,15 +1,28 @@
 # Abbreviated C.V.
 
-- Associate Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology
+- Assistant Professor, College of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University
+- Assistant/Associate Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007-2015
 - Ph.D. (2007), History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, Johns Hopkins
 University
 - M.A. (2002), B.A. (2000), History, University of Nevada--Las Vegas
 
 ## Selected Publications
 
-- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">_Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._ </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014).
+- <a
+  href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">_Seeing
+  Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._
+  </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014).
 
-- "Underground Mine Maps & the Development of the Butte System at the Turn of the Twentieth Century," _IA: Journal of the Society for Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\]
+    Winner of the Mining History Association’s 2015 Clark C. Spence
+    Award for the best scholarly book on mining history published
+    2013-2014.
+
+- "Underground Mine Maps & the Development of the Butte System at the
+  Turn of the Twentieth Century," _IA: Journal of the Society for
+  Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\]
+
+    Winner of the Society for Industrial Archeology’s 2015 Robert Vogel
+    Prize for best journal article.
 
 - "In the Aftermath of Tragedy: Herschel Wence and the 1925 City Mine
   Disaster, Sullivan Co., Indiana," _Mining History Journal_ 21 (2014):
@@ -80,21 +93,32 @@ University
 - [Society for Industrial Archeology][sia]
 
 I have served as editor of the [_Mining History News_][newsletter],
-the quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha], since
-2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I am also a council member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's [Research Grants Committee][mhagrants] (please apply!).
+the quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha],
+since 2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I
+am also a council member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's [Research
+Grants Committee][mhagrants] (please apply!).
 
 Since 2009, I have been Vice-Chair of [TEMSIG][temsig], the Technology and
 Museums Special Interest Group of the [Society for the History of
 Technology][shot].  Among other duties, I am keeper of the listserv,
 so if you are interested in joining [TEMSIG][temsig], please contact me.
 
-The [National Council on Public History's][ncph] Student Project and Graduate Student Travel Award Committee has counted me as a member since 2013. Every year the committee awards up to five [$300 grants to enable graduate students to travel][ncphawards] to the NCPH Annual Meeting, plus a $500 award for the [best public history student project][ncphawards]. Please encourage any grad students with relevant interests to consider applying!
-
-I have been an actively involved with the [National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House][sbah]
-since 2008 as a member and co-chair of the Collections and Education
-Committee.  I have also served on the steering committee for the museum's long range plan, and I joined the Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves and interprets
-the longtime Rochester, NY home of famed equal rights advocate Susan
-B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
+The [National Council on Public History's][ncph] Student Project and
+Graduate Student Travel Award Committee has counted me as a member
+since 2013. Every year the committee awards up to five [$300 grants to
+enable graduate students to travel][ncphawards] to the NCPH Annual
+Meeting, plus a $500 award for the [best public history student
+project][ncphawards]. Please encourage any grad students with relevant
+interests to consider applying!
+
+I have been an actively involved with the [National Susan B. Anthony
+Museum and House][sbah] since 2008 as a member and past of the
+Collections and Education Committee.  I have also served on the
+steering committee for the museum's long range plan, and I joined the
+Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves
+and interprets the longtime Rochester, NY home of famed equal rights
+advocate Susan B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic
+Landmark.
 
 [oah]: http://www.oah.org
 [shot]: http://www.historyoftechnology.org

added meta viewport
diff --git a/templates/page.tmpl b/templates/page.tmpl
index 811bdb7..105f852 100644
--- a/templates/page.tmpl
+++ b/templates/page.tmpl
@@ -5,6 +5,7 @@
 <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
 </TMPL_IF>
 <head>
+<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
 <TMPL_IF DYNAMIC>
 <TMPL_IF FORCEBASEURL><base href="<TMPL_VAR FORCEBASEURL>" /><TMPL_ELSE>
 <TMPL_IF BASEURL><base href="<TMPL_VAR BASEURL>" /></TMPL_IF>

updated date stamp
diff --git a/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn b/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn
index 75ad6d3..76f6bef 100644
--- a/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 [[!tag census research_tips digital]]
-# Links for Collections of U.S. Census Materials
+[[!meta  date="Mon Mar 16 13:52:02 EDT 2015"]]
 
-In working with manuscript census materials, modern data derived from them, and published documents from the Census Bureau, I found myself coming back to particular resources time and again.  In a hope this might be of use to someone else, I've put together this list of those I use most frequently. If you have suggestions or corrections, please [[contact me|about]]. 
+In working with manuscript census materials, modern data derived from them, and published documents from the Census Bureau, I found myself coming back to particular resources time and again.  In a hope this might be of use to someone else, I've put together this list of those I use most frequently. If you have suggestions or corrections, please [[contact me|about]] or leave a note in the comments, below. 
 
 ## Manuscript materials
 

Initial document, with links to some census resources I use a lot
diff --git a/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn b/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..75ad6d3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Links_for_Census_Materials.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,55 @@
+[[!tag census research_tips digital]]
+# Links for Collections of U.S. Census Materials
+
+In working with manuscript census materials, modern data derived from them, and published documents from the Census Bureau, I found myself coming back to particular resources time and again.  In a hope this might be of use to someone else, I've put together this list of those I use most frequently. If you have suggestions or corrections, please [[contact me|about]]. 
+
+## Manuscript materials
+
+- Main page for manuscript population schedules, 1790--1930, digitized from NARA microfilm, hosted on the Internet Archive:
+   <https://archive.org/details/us_census>
+
+- The [1940 manuscript census](http://1940census.archives.gov/), with full access provided at no charge by NARA.
+
+- [The Unified Enumeration District Finder](http://stevemorse.org/census/unified.html) -- choose the desired year in the dropdown box in the title. Helps you find Enumeration Districts from addresses, for 1880-1940 censuses. In other words, you use this to help you find a key piece of information necessary to allow you to look up a particular *place* in the census.  A quirky but amazing site.
+
+- Modern re-creations of census forms, helpful for deciphering questions (i.e. these are readable, but double-check each against an original) or for taking notes on a limited number of people: <http://www.cyndislist.com/us/census/forms/>
+
+## Data sources
+
+- [North Atlantic Population Project](https://www.nappdata.org).  Also see my technical description of my [[napptools|napptools:_the_gory_details]] programs.  This is microdata, not compiled numbers (for those, you want the Historical Census Data Browser, below).
+
+- IPUMS microdata samples of 1850 and 1860 [slave censuses](https://usa.ipums.org/usa/slavepums/index.html).
+
+- [National Historic GIS](http://www.nhgis.org): Microdata and mapping shapefiles, from the good folks at the [Minnesota Population Center](http://www.pop.umn.edu), who brought you IPUMS, NAPP, and other microdata projects.
+
+- [Historical Census Data Browser](http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu/), University of Virginia. This is the one you want if you are looking for data down to the county level, over a wide time span. It can also filter data by a number of variables, which is extremely powerful.
+
+- 20th century county-level population counts, from the Census Bureau, arranged by state: ["County Population Census Counts 1900-90"](http://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/cencounts/index.html)  Just simple text files with tabular data, but sometimes that's all you need.
+
+## U.S. Census publications
+
+- Census Bureau:  Published books from the census, in annoying linked PDF format: <http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html> (or via [FTP here](ftp://ftp.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/)).  The Dubester catalog is helpful in figuring out what's what, and what is missing. There is data available in tabular form in these publications that hasn't made its way to the databases, so it can still be helpful to access them. These particular scans are not high quality, unfortunately, but far better than no access at all.
+
+- Census Bureau Library, on archive.org.  Contains mostly mid-late 20th century reports.  Difficult to search, as may be imagined.  <https://archive.org/details/CensusBureauLibrary>
+
+- Census Bureau FTP site, includes many historic publications (note, mirrored on IA in a [huge tarball](https://archive.org/details/ftp.census.gov)): 
+   <ftp://ftp.census.gov>
+
+- Henry J. Dubester, *Catalog of United States Census Publications, 1790-1945* (Washington: GPO, 1950).  The standard, though the Census Bureau has stopped listing the Dubester numbers for early publications on their site, so it's not quite as important to use it to navigate. Still helpful to make sure you have seen what there is to see, and to help decipher similarly-named documents. Available as one half of [this huge PDF](http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/catalogues/CensusCatalog1790-1972.pdf), or at [HathiTrust](http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015081108055) (Note: The first link above has a second piece that picks up where Dubester left off and continues to 1972.) Kevin Cook published a revised version in 1996 that [provides SuDoc numbers](http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/45732119) for the publications listed by Dubester, making them much easier to find in a modern Government Publications depository library.
+
+- Henry J. Dubester, *State Censuses: An Annotated Bibliography of Census of Population Taken After
+the Year 1790 by States and Territories of the United States* (Washington,
+DC: Government Printing Office, 1948), 73 pages. [Google Books](https://books.google.com/books?id=5VwiI4DoDLYC)
+
+- Yearly Catalogs of Census publications (more recent era): <https://www.census.gov/prod/www/catalogs.html>
+
+- Jason G. Gauthier, *Measuring America: The Decennial Censuses from 1790 to 2000* (\[Washington\]: U.S. Census Bureau, 2002), <http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/pol02-ma.pdf>  This is a very detailed chronology of census information that can be quite helpful in figuring out exactly what was asked when, and what survived. Includes images of the population schedules.
+
+## Commercial services
+
+I try to avoid these, but especially if you are trying to trace the history of a particular individual, they are powerful and can save you some legwork.  Note that if you happen to be in the vicinity of a [National Archives facility](http://www.archives.gov/locations/), you can use them (and others) for free on-site, as part of a deal struck when NARA began permitting the companies to digitize NARA records in huge batches.
+
+- <http://www.familysearch.org> -- fewer sources, but at least makes some data available without charge.
+- <http://www.ancestry.com>
+- http://www.heritagequest.com -- typically accessed through libraries
+- <http://fold3.com> -- emphasizes military records

calendar update
diff --git a/archives/2015.mdwn b/archives/2015.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..303f603
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+[[!calendar type=year year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/01.mdwn b/archives/2015/01.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..7930876
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/01.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=01 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(01) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/02.mdwn b/archives/2015/02.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..6017022
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/02.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=02 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(02) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/03.mdwn b/archives/2015/03.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..ccc0743
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/03.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=03 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(03) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/04.mdwn b/archives/2015/04.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..a79d46e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/04.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=04 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(04) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/05.mdwn b/archives/2015/05.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..1ad2829
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/05.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=05 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(05) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/06.mdwn b/archives/2015/06.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..58cd2cb
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/06.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=06 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(06) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/07.mdwn b/archives/2015/07.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..14cac40
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/07.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=07 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(07) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/08.mdwn b/archives/2015/08.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..65f1bc8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/08.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=08 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(08) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/09.mdwn b/archives/2015/09.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d772ddf
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/09.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=09 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(09) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/10.mdwn b/archives/2015/10.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e22ac54
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/10.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=10 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(10) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/11.mdwn b/archives/2015/11.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..1fd564b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/11.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=11 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(11) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]
diff --git a/archives/2015/12.mdwn b/archives/2015/12.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5ae9222
--- /dev/null
+++ b/archives/2015/12.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+[[!sidebar content="""
+[[!calendar type=month month=12 year=2015 pages="page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion"]]
+"""]]
+
+[[!inline pages="creation_month(12) and creation_year(2015) and page(posts/*) and !*/Discussion" show=0 feeds=no reverse=yes]]

Added Nevada Census Microdata entry
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index bceca8c..4819369 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -61,6 +61,15 @@ University
   to help historians and researchers find and use historic records and
   briefs of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, dating from the 1890s to the 1960s. (Feb. 2013--)
 
+- Ronald M. James, Kenneth H. Fliess, and **Eric Nystrom**, *Nevada Census
+  Microdata, 1860-1920*, Harvard Dataverse Network [Distributor],
+  (1991--2014). Current version: v2, released
+  Dec. 31, 2014. <http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/27218>
+
+  This is a complete-count data set of six decades worth of Nevada
+  manuscript census records, which I helped to document, update, and
+  make available for public use. (2014--)
+
 ## Professional Societies and Service
 
 - [Society for the History of Technology][shot]

added MHJ 2014 article, 9chris dates
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 947e0c4..bceca8c 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -11,6 +11,10 @@ University
 
 - "Underground Mine Maps & the Development of the Butte System at the Turn of the Twentieth Century," _IA: Journal of the Society for Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\]
 
+- "In the Aftermath of Tragedy: Herschel Wence and the 1925 City Mine
+  Disaster, Sullivan Co., Indiana," _Mining History Journal_ 21 (2014):
+  22-29.
+
 - "'Brilliant Contingency of Legal Talent and Mining Experts': A
   Tonopah Apex Lawsuit, 1914-1918," _Nevada Historical Society
   Quarterly_ 54 (2011): 101-125. \[2013\]
@@ -55,7 +59,7 @@ University
 - I created, developed, and maintain [9CHRIS: The 9th Circuit
   Historical Records Index System][9chris], which serves as a resource
   to help historians and researchers find and use historic records and
-  briefs of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
+  briefs of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, dating from the 1890s to the 1960s. (Feb. 2013--)
 
 ## Professional Societies and Service
 

creating tag page tags/person
diff --git a/tags/person.mdwn b/tags/person.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d3b7dfa
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/person.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged person"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(person)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 24f400c..947e0c4 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -61,6 +61,7 @@ University
 
 - [Society for the History of Technology][shot]
 - [National Council on Public History][ncph]
+- [Western History Association][wha]
 - [Mining History Association][mha]
 - [Organization of American Historians][oah]
 - [Society for Industrial Archeology][sia]
@@ -93,3 +94,4 @@ B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 [sbah]: http://susanbanthonyhouse.org
 [9chris]: http://9chris.org
 [temsig]: http://www.temsig.org
+[wha]: http://www.westernhistoryassociation.wildapricot.org

create page
diff --git a/eric/private.mdwn b/eric/private.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..7560bb3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/eric/private.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# Notes etc.
+
+Notes etc in private directory.

diff --git a/eric.mdwn b/eric.mdwn
index 986c373..1045004 100644
--- a/eric.mdwn
+++ b/eric.mdwn
@@ -6,6 +6,8 @@
 
 Draft posts.
 
+[[Secret Stuff|private]]
+
 [[!inline pages="page(./posts/*) 
     and tagged(draft)
     and !*/Discussion" 

Added tags and published
diff --git a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
index b734464..5f19ff9 100644
--- a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
+++ b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
-[[!tag draft]]
+[[!tag census west digital]]
+[[!meta  date="Thu Sep 11 10:46:06 EDT 2014"]]
 
-As I've [[noted before|tags/census]], manuscript records collected by the census can be fascinating and informative windows on the past, because they can be used to learn more about groups of people that appear only occasionally in the historical record, and because they are generally well-structured and can be used, with care, to ask data-driven historical questions. When most historians think of using historical census sources, it's the forms from the decennial census of population that come immediately to mind.  These are well-known sources, but there are always fresh nuances to discover.  I stumbled over one of these just the other day.
+As I've [[noted before|tags/census]], manuscript records collected by the census can be fascinating and informative windows to the past. They can be used to learn more about groups of people that appear only occasionally in the historical record, and since they are generally well-structured, they can be used (with care) to ask data-driven historical questions. When most historians think of using historical census sources, it's the forms from the decennial census of population that come immediately to mind.  These are well-known sources, but there are always fresh nuances to discover.  I stumbled over one of these just the other day.
 
 This was news to me: the 1910 federal census used [different forms][washoegenoa1910] to record American Indians.  These filled-out forms were combined on microfilm together with those manuscript schedules that had been used to record [the rest of the population][genoa1910], but the Indian-specific forms reflected and reinforced their non-equal place in American society.
 

edits, added image
diff --git a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
index 2b5f269..b734464 100644
--- a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
+++ b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
@@ -1,30 +1,44 @@
 [[!tag draft]]
 
-As I've [[noted before|tags/census]], manuscript records collected by the census can be fascinating and informative windows on the past, because they can be used to learn more about groups of people that appear only occasionally in the historical record, and because they are generally well-structured and can be used, with care, to ask data-driven historical questions. When most historians think of using historical census sources, it's the manuscript forms from the decennial census of population that come immediately to mind.  These are well-known sources, but there are always fresh nuances to discover.  I stumbled over one of these just the other day.
+As I've [[noted before|tags/census]], manuscript records collected by the census can be fascinating and informative windows on the past, because they can be used to learn more about groups of people that appear only occasionally in the historical record, and because they are generally well-structured and can be used, with care, to ask data-driven historical questions. When most historians think of using historical census sources, it's the forms from the decennial census of population that come immediately to mind.  These are well-known sources, but there are always fresh nuances to discover.  I stumbled over one of these just the other day.
 
 This was news to me: the 1910 federal census used [different forms][washoegenoa1910] to record American Indians.  These filled-out forms were combined on microfilm together with those manuscript schedules that had been used to record [the rest of the population][genoa1910], but the Indian-specific forms reflected and reinforced their non-equal place in American society.
 
-But then one discovery led to another: in the course of trying to find out more about these forms, I quickly became aware of how little I knew about [finding American Indians in the census][nara-indians].  In the 1800s, American Indians were only rarely counted by enumerators in the way the rest of the population was. On the other hand, the U.S. government occasionally conducted efforts to record American Indians specifically.
+But then one find led to another: in the course of trying to find out more about these forms, I quickly became aware of how little I knew about [finding American Indians in the census][nara-indians].  In the 1800s, American Indians were only rarely counted by enumerators in the way the non-Indian population was. On the other hand, the U.S. government occasionally tried to record American Indians specifically. So policies of separation and difference ended up having an unintended outcome, leaving behind primary sources that help us know more about these groups than we otherwise might.
 
 ## The "Indian Census Rolls"
 
 Though information about American Indians can be found in a variety of census publications, one of the largest is the set of microfilmed copies of the [Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940][indiancensusarticle].  These forms were the result of instructions to federal Indian agents to tally all of the American Indians living on reservations under their jurisdiction.  [As this detailed article from the National Archives makes clear][indiancensusarticle], despite the wide scope of coverage, the forms did not cover every recognized group of American Indians, nor did they list non-affiliated members.  
 
+[[!img indiancensusroll020unit_0048.jpg align="right" size="400x400" alt="Image from Indian Census, 1933"]]
+
 But these documents do have certain advantages over traditional census forms.  Unlike the regular census, the "Indian Census" rolls were supposed to be recorded or updated every year.  Many of the records were typed instead of handwritten (hooray!), and for some years, records of individuals included a direct reference to the same person on the previous year's form, greatly easing the work of tracing a person through time.  
 
-The Indian Census Rolls were long available only on microfilm, which limited access to them.  Recently they have been digitized and made available for searching through genealogy websites ancestry.com and fold3.com, where they are available to subscribers.  But they can also be accessed for free with a little extra work, as the microfilm reels published by the National Archives [have been digitized by the Internet Archive][ia-indian-census].
+The Indian Census Rolls were long available only on microfilm, which limited access to them.  Recently they have been digitized and made available for searching through genealogy websites ancestry.com and fold3.com, where they are available to paid subscribers.  If you are just looking for the name of a particular ancestor, the paid sites are undoubtedly the easiest way to find that needle in a haystack.  But the records can also be accessed for free with a little extra work, as the microfilm reels published by the National Archives [have been digitized by the Internet Archive][ia-indian-census].  Usage patterns for [9CHRIS][9chris], a site I built to help [make historic court records accessible][9chrisdocs], suggest that there is a lot of demand for greater access to federal records about American Indians, so I thought it might be useful to describe how to use the freely-available Indian Census.
 
 ## Using the Finding Aid and the Internet Archive
 
-To find the rolls for a particular American Indian tribe or group, first look them up in the [Finding Aid][m595] to find out what "agency" was responsible for reporting about them.  Sometimes a single agency might report about several tribal groups, and the opposite was also sometimes the case, where a particular tribe might fall under the jurisdiction of several agencies.  For example if I were looking for the Washoe (also spelled "Washo"), I would see that the Bishop, Carson, and Walker River agencies each had jurisdiction.
+Here's how to find the rolls for a particular American Indian tribe or group in the freely-available Indian Census sources:
+
+1. First look them up in the [finding aid][m595] to find out what "agency" was responsible for reporting about them.  Agencies were units of geography, which sometimes (but not always) reflected federally-designated reservations.  Sometimes a single agency might report about several tribal groups, and the opposite was also sometimes the case, where a particular tribe might fall under the jurisdiction of several agencies. 
+
+     For example if I were looking for the Washoe (also spelled "Washo"), I would see that the Bishop, Carson, and Walker River agencies each had jurisdiction.
+
+2. Next, use the second list, located later in the same [finding aid document][m595], to find out what reels of microfilm contain the records for that agency.  (The agencies are listed in alphabetical order.)  Some agencies share space on the same reel of microfilm, and in other cases the agency's records are spread across multiple reels, with a few years to each reel.  Note the reel number you are interested in, in the left column. 
 
-Next, later in the same [Finding Aid document][m595], use the second list to find out what reels of microfilm contain the records for that agency.  (The agencies are listed in alphabetical order.)  Some agencies share space on the same reel of microfilm, and in other cases the agency's records are spread across multiple reels.  Note the reel number you are interested in, in the left column. To continue the example, the Carson agency has records on reels 18, 19, 20, and 21.
+     To continue the example, the Carson agency has records on reels 18, 19, 20, and 21.  If I wanted to see records from 1933, I'd choose reel 20.
 
-Now we can go to the [Internet Archive][ia-indian-census] and look for the reel we want.  I searched for "Indians of North America" AND census AND Reel 020" and it returned precisely the [result I wanted][result]. The reel can be read online, or downloaded as a (very large) PDF.  Within each agency, the records appear to be divided by year, and then by the "reservation" or administrative unit within the broader agency, which are organized alphabetically within each year. In this case I skipped over several administrative units before coming to the Carson Valley subunit, where the people I was looking up lived.
+3. Now we can go to the [Internet Archive][ia-indian-census] and look for the reel we want.  I searched for "Indians of North America" AND census AND Reel 020" (note the reel number is always three digits) and it returned precisely the [result I wanted][result]. 
+
+4. The reel can be read online, or downloaded as a (very large) PDF.  Within each agency, the records are typically divided by year, and then by the "reservation" or administrative unit within the broader agency, which are organized alphabetically within each year. 
+
+     In this case, the records from 1933 were at the beginning of the reel. I skipped over several administrative units (Austin, Battle Mountain, Beowawe) before coming to the Carson Valley subunit, where the people I was looking up lived.
+
+5. To save a copy of a page in the online viewer, right-click on the image and choose "Save Image As..." to download it.  The [Internet Archive][ia] also built their online viewer so that each specific page in every document has a unique URL, so you can just copy and paste the URL from your browser bar.
 
 ## Conclusion
 
-Historians, social scientists, independent researchers, and genealogists all make extensive use of the manuscript historical census.  The discrimination and unequal treatment faced by many ethnic and racial minorities in the past is sometimes reflected in their absence or unequal treatment in the census.  But sometimes, as in the case of some Native Americans, these social attitudes led to policies that left behind, as a side effect, documentation that helps us understand their lives better than we would otherwise.
+Historians, social scientists, independent researchers, and genealogists all make extensive use of the manuscript historical census.  The discrimination and unequal treatment faced by many ethnic and racial minorities in the past is sometimes reflected in their absence or unequal treatment in the census.  But sometimes, as in the case of some Native Americans, these social attitudes led to policies that left behind, as a side effect, documentation that helps us understand their lives and history better than we would otherwise.
 
 <!-- LINKS -->
 
@@ -35,3 +49,7 @@ Historians, social scientists, independent researchers, and genealogists all mak
 [ia-indian-census]: https://archive.org/details/indian_census
 [m595]: http://www.archives.gov/research/microfilm/m595.pdf
 [result]: https://archive.org/search.php?query=%22indians%20of%20north%20america%22%20AND%20census%20AND%20%22reel%20020%22%20collection%3Aadditional_collections
+[9chris]: http://9chris.org
+[9chrisdocs]: http://9chris.org/docs/
+[ia]: http://archive.org
+

attachment upload
diff --git a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census/indiancensusroll020unit_0048.jpg b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census/indiancensusroll020unit_0048.jpg
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4594f31
Binary files /dev/null and b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census/indiancensusroll020unit_0048.jpg differ

reworked introduction, wrote conclusion
diff --git a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
index bcae875..2b5f269 100644
--- a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
+++ b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
@@ -1,18 +1,30 @@
 [[!tag draft]]
 
-Recently I stumbled over an interesting set of historical sources in the course of looking for something else, which seems to happen a lot! This time, I learned that the 1910 federal census used [different forms][washoegenoa1910] to record American Indians.  These filled-out forms were combined on microfilm together with those manuscript schedules that had been used to record [the rest of the population][genoa1910], but the Indian-specific forms reflected and reinforced their non-equal place in American society.
+As I've [[noted before|tags/census]], manuscript records collected by the census can be fascinating and informative windows on the past, because they can be used to learn more about groups of people that appear only occasionally in the historical record, and because they are generally well-structured and can be used, with care, to ask data-driven historical questions. When most historians think of using historical census sources, it's the manuscript forms from the decennial census of population that come immediately to mind.  These are well-known sources, but there are always fresh nuances to discover.  I stumbled over one of these just the other day.
 
-One discovery led to another: in the course of trying to find out more about these forms, I quickly became aware of how little I knew about [finding American Indians in the census][nara-indians].  Though information about American Indians can be found in a variety of census publications, one of the largest is the set of microfilmed copies of the [Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940][indiancensusarticle].  These forms were the result of instructions to federal Indian agents to tally all of the American Indians living on reservations under their jurisdiction.  [As this detailed article from the National Archives makes clear][indiancensusarticle], despite the wide scope of coverage, the forms did not cover every recognized group of American Indians, nor did they list non-affiliated members.  
+This was news to me: the 1910 federal census used [different forms][washoegenoa1910] to record American Indians.  These filled-out forms were combined on microfilm together with those manuscript schedules that had been used to record [the rest of the population][genoa1910], but the Indian-specific forms reflected and reinforced their non-equal place in American society.
+
+But then one discovery led to another: in the course of trying to find out more about these forms, I quickly became aware of how little I knew about [finding American Indians in the census][nara-indians].  In the 1800s, American Indians were only rarely counted by enumerators in the way the rest of the population was. On the other hand, the U.S. government occasionally conducted efforts to record American Indians specifically.
+
+## The "Indian Census Rolls"
+
+Though information about American Indians can be found in a variety of census publications, one of the largest is the set of microfilmed copies of the [Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940][indiancensusarticle].  These forms were the result of instructions to federal Indian agents to tally all of the American Indians living on reservations under their jurisdiction.  [As this detailed article from the National Archives makes clear][indiancensusarticle], despite the wide scope of coverage, the forms did not cover every recognized group of American Indians, nor did they list non-affiliated members.  
 
 But these documents do have certain advantages over traditional census forms.  Unlike the regular census, the "Indian Census" rolls were supposed to be recorded or updated every year.  Many of the records were typed instead of handwritten (hooray!), and for some years, records of individuals included a direct reference to the same person on the previous year's form, greatly easing the work of tracing a person through time.  
 
 The Indian Census Rolls were long available only on microfilm, which limited access to them.  Recently they have been digitized and made available for searching through genealogy websites ancestry.com and fold3.com, where they are available to subscribers.  But they can also be accessed for free with a little extra work, as the microfilm reels published by the National Archives [have been digitized by the Internet Archive][ia-indian-census].
 
-To find the rolls for a particular American Indian tribe or group, first look them up in the [Finding Aid][m595] to find out what "agency" was responsible for reporting about them.  Sometimes a single agency might report about several tribal groups, and the opposite was also sometimes the case, where a particular tribe might fall under the jurisdiction of several agencies.  For example if I were looking for the Washo, I would see that the Bishop, Carson, and Walker River agencies each had jurisdiction.
+## Using the Finding Aid and the Internet Archive
+
+To find the rolls for a particular American Indian tribe or group, first look them up in the [Finding Aid][m595] to find out what "agency" was responsible for reporting about them.  Sometimes a single agency might report about several tribal groups, and the opposite was also sometimes the case, where a particular tribe might fall under the jurisdiction of several agencies.  For example if I were looking for the Washoe (also spelled "Washo"), I would see that the Bishop, Carson, and Walker River agencies each had jurisdiction.
 
 Next, later in the same [Finding Aid document][m595], use the second list to find out what reels of microfilm contain the records for that agency.  (The agencies are listed in alphabetical order.)  Some agencies share space on the same reel of microfilm, and in other cases the agency's records are spread across multiple reels.  Note the reel number you are interested in, in the left column. To continue the example, the Carson agency has records on reels 18, 19, 20, and 21.
 
-Now we can go to the [Internet Archive][ia-indian-census] and look for the reel we want.  I searched for "Indians of North America" AND census AND Reel 020" and it returned precisely the [result I wanted][result]. The reel can be read online, or downloaded as a (very large) PDF.  Within each agency, the records appear to be divided by year, and then by the "reservation" or administrative unit within the broader agency, which are organized alphabetically within each year.
+Now we can go to the [Internet Archive][ia-indian-census] and look for the reel we want.  I searched for "Indians of North America" AND census AND Reel 020" and it returned precisely the [result I wanted][result]. The reel can be read online, or downloaded as a (very large) PDF.  Within each agency, the records appear to be divided by year, and then by the "reservation" or administrative unit within the broader agency, which are organized alphabetically within each year. In this case I skipped over several administrative units before coming to the Carson Valley subunit, where the people I was looking up lived.
+
+## Conclusion
+
+Historians, social scientists, independent researchers, and genealogists all make extensive use of the manuscript historical census.  The discrimination and unequal treatment faced by many ethnic and racial minorities in the past is sometimes reflected in their absence or unequal treatment in the census.  But sometimes, as in the case of some Native Americans, these social attitudes led to policies that left behind, as a side effect, documentation that helps us understand their lives better than we would otherwise.
 
 <!-- LINKS -->
 

Initial draft
diff --git a/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..bcae875
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/American_Indians_and_the_Census.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+[[!tag draft]]
+
+Recently I stumbled over an interesting set of historical sources in the course of looking for something else, which seems to happen a lot! This time, I learned that the 1910 federal census used [different forms][washoegenoa1910] to record American Indians.  These filled-out forms were combined on microfilm together with those manuscript schedules that had been used to record [the rest of the population][genoa1910], but the Indian-specific forms reflected and reinforced their non-equal place in American society.
+
+One discovery led to another: in the course of trying to find out more about these forms, I quickly became aware of how little I knew about [finding American Indians in the census][nara-indians].  Though information about American Indians can be found in a variety of census publications, one of the largest is the set of microfilmed copies of the [Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940][indiancensusarticle].  These forms were the result of instructions to federal Indian agents to tally all of the American Indians living on reservations under their jurisdiction.  [As this detailed article from the National Archives makes clear][indiancensusarticle], despite the wide scope of coverage, the forms did not cover every recognized group of American Indians, nor did they list non-affiliated members.  
+
+But these documents do have certain advantages over traditional census forms.  Unlike the regular census, the "Indian Census" rolls were supposed to be recorded or updated every year.  Many of the records were typed instead of handwritten (hooray!), and for some years, records of individuals included a direct reference to the same person on the previous year's form, greatly easing the work of tracing a person through time.  
+
+The Indian Census Rolls were long available only on microfilm, which limited access to them.  Recently they have been digitized and made available for searching through genealogy websites ancestry.com and fold3.com, where they are available to subscribers.  But they can also be accessed for free with a little extra work, as the microfilm reels published by the National Archives [have been digitized by the Internet Archive][ia-indian-census].
+
+To find the rolls for a particular American Indian tribe or group, first look them up in the [Finding Aid][m595] to find out what "agency" was responsible for reporting about them.  Sometimes a single agency might report about several tribal groups, and the opposite was also sometimes the case, where a particular tribe might fall under the jurisdiction of several agencies.  For example if I were looking for the Washo, I would see that the Bishop, Carson, and Walker River agencies each had jurisdiction.
+
+Next, later in the same [Finding Aid document][m595], use the second list to find out what reels of microfilm contain the records for that agency.  (The agencies are listed in alphabetical order.)  Some agencies share space on the same reel of microfilm, and in other cases the agency's records are spread across multiple reels.  Note the reel number you are interested in, in the left column. To continue the example, the Carson agency has records on reels 18, 19, 20, and 21.
+
+Now we can go to the [Internet Archive][ia-indian-census] and look for the reel we want.  I searched for "Indians of North America" AND census AND Reel 020" and it returned precisely the [result I wanted][result]. The reel can be read online, or downloaded as a (very large) PDF.  Within each agency, the records appear to be divided by year, and then by the "reservation" or administrative unit within the broader agency, which are organized alphabetically within each year.
+
+<!-- LINKS -->
+
+[washoegenoa1910]: https://archive.org/stream/12thcensusofpopu943unit#page/n74/mode/1up
+[genoa1910]: https://archive.org/stream/12thcensusofpopu943unit#page/n41/mode/1up
+[nara-indians]: http://www.archives.gov/research/census/native-americans/
+[indiancensusarticle]: http://www.archives.gov/research/census/native-americans/1885-1940.html
+[ia-indian-census]: https://archive.org/details/indian_census
+[m595]: http://www.archives.gov/research/microfilm/m595.pdf
+[result]: https://archive.org/search.php?query=%22indians%20of%20north%20america%22%20AND%20census%20AND%20%22reel%20020%22%20collection%3Aadditional_collections

initial draft
diff --git a/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn b/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..f392b85
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Needles__44___Haystacks__44___and_Legal_History.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+[[!tag draft]]
+
+Summer has come to a close for all of us tied to the academic calendar, which should make it a good time to reflect on a fun collaborative project I've been occasionally hacking on for the last several months. This project, which I'm pursuing in partnership with historian [David Tanenhaus][dt] with important support from the [Boyd School of Law Library][boydlibrary] at [UNLV][unlv], has two goals: to explore possible utilities of digital tools in legal history, and second, to try to use those tools to uncover buried historical connections in sources related to the evolution of juvenile justice policy in the United States during the Clinton era.  
+
+WHY LEGAL HISTORY?
+
+THE SOURCES
+
+SEARCH TECHNIQUES
+
+FUTURE PROMISE
+
+
+
+<!-- LINKS -->
+[dt]: http://www.unlv.edu/people/david-tanenhaus
+[boydlibrary]: http://www.law.unlv.edu/law-library/home.html
+[unlv]: http://www.unlv.edu
+

diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index ae555d3..a670a3e 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-[[!tag census, digital, microdata, napp, history_of_technology, sql]]
+[[!tag census digital microdata napp history_of_technology sql]]
 [[!meta  date="2014-07-26 11:44"]]
 
 [[Census microdata|NAPP census microdata]], such as that produced by
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ those job types earned 70 years later.  However, if used carefully,
 `OCSCORUS`, like `SEIUS`, can put all workers somewhere on a universal
 scale in order to compare them. 
 
-## A simple examples
+## A simple example
 
 Let's take a look at a simple example and the SQL code
 needed to calculate it.  ([[Here's how I set up a SQLite database with

updated with twitter link
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 9651f50..330c686 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ at RIT][mycourses].
 
 - **email:** eric -dot- nystrom -at- rit -dot- edu
 
-- **Twitter:** @HistoryNystrom
+- **Twitter:** [@HistoryNystrom](https://twitter.com/HistoryNystrom)
 
    [RIT]: http://www.rit.edu
 

added SIA article, added NCPH grants, tweaked other wording
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index a85b05a..24f400c 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -9,9 +9,11 @@ University
 
 - <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">_Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._ </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014).
 
+- "Underground Mine Maps & the Development of the Butte System at the Turn of the Twentieth Century," _IA: Journal of the Society for Industrial Archeology_ 37, Nos. 1 and 2 (2011): 97-113. \[2014\]
+
 - "'Brilliant Contingency of Legal Talent and Mining Experts': A
   Tonopah Apex Lawsuit, 1914-1918," _Nevada Historical Society
-  Quarterly_ 54 (2011): 101-125.
+  Quarterly_ 54 (2011): 101-125. \[2013\]
 
 - "Authority and Visual Culture in American Mining Technology,
   1860-1920," in _Mining Perspectives: Proceedings of the 8th
@@ -61,19 +63,22 @@ University
 - [National Council on Public History][ncph]
 - [Mining History Association][mha]
 - [Organization of American Historians][oah]
+- [Society for Industrial Archeology][sia]
 
 I have served as editor of the [_Mining History News_][newsletter],
 the quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha], since
-2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I am also a Council Member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's Grants Committee.
+2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I am also a council member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's [Research Grants Committee][mhagrants] (please apply!).
 
 Since 2009, I have been Vice-Chair of [TEMSIG][temsig], the Technology and
 Museums Special Interest Group of the [Society for the History of
 Technology][shot].  Among other duties, I am keeper of the listserv,
-so if you are interested in joining TEMSIG, please contact me.
+so if you are interested in joining [TEMSIG][temsig], please contact me.
+
+The [National Council on Public History's][ncph] Student Project and Graduate Student Travel Award Committee has counted me as a member since 2013. Every year the committee awards up to five [$300 grants to enable graduate students to travel][ncphawards] to the NCPH Annual Meeting, plus a $500 award for the [best public history student project][ncphawards]. Please encourage any grad students with relevant interests to consider applying!
 
-I have been an active member of the Collections and Education
-Committee of the [National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House][sbah]
-since 2008, and joined the Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves and interprets
+I have been an actively involved with the [National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House][sbah]
+since 2008 as a member and co-chair of the Collections and Education
+Committee.  I have also served on the steering committee for the museum's long range plan, and I joined the Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves and interprets
 the longtime Rochester, NY home of famed equal rights advocate Susan
 B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 
@@ -81,7 +86,10 @@ B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 [shot]: http://www.historyoftechnology.org
 [ncph]: http://www.ncph.org
 [mha]: http://www.mininghistoryassociation.org
+[sia]: http://www.sia-web.org
 [newsletter]: http://www.mininghistoryassociation.org/news.htm
+[mhagrants]: http://mininghistoryassociation.org/ResearchGrants.htm
+[ncphawards]: http://ncph.org/cms/awards/student-awards/
 [sbah]: http://susanbanthonyhouse.org
 [9chris]: http://9chris.org
 [temsig]: http://www.temsig.org

fix tag formatting
diff --git a/tags/census__44__.mdwn b/tags/census__44__.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644
index 7a071e2..0000000
--- a/tags/census__44__.mdwn
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta title="pages tagged census,"]]
-
-[[!inline pages="tagged(census__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
-feedshow=10]]
diff --git a/tags/digital__44__.mdwn b/tags/digital__44__.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644
index 9220c2d..0000000
--- a/tags/digital__44__.mdwn
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta title="pages tagged digital,"]]
-
-[[!inline pages="tagged(digital__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
-feedshow=10]]
diff --git a/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn b/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644
index 913a4af..0000000
--- a/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta title="pages tagged history of technology,"]]
-
-[[!inline pages="tagged(history_of_technology__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
-feedshow=10]]
diff --git a/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn b/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644
index 88f6229..0000000
--- a/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta title="pages tagged microdata,"]]
-
-[[!inline pages="tagged(microdata__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
-feedshow=10]]
diff --git a/tags/napp__44__.mdwn b/tags/napp__44__.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644
index b704279..0000000
--- a/tags/napp__44__.mdwn
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta title="pages tagged napp,"]]
-
-[[!inline pages="tagged(napp__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
-feedshow=10]]

some initial thoughts on a draft post about widowed women and labor in 1880 thru census microdata
diff --git a/posts/Work_and_Widowhood_in_1880.mdwn b/posts/Work_and_Widowhood_in_1880.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5d8c848
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Work_and_Widowhood_in_1880.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,97 @@
+[[!tag draft]]
+
+POST ABOUT LABOR/WORK AND WIDOWED WOMEN, SHOWING HOW TO USE NAPP TO INVESTIGATE GENDER, WORK, AND MARITAL STATUS.
+
+INITIAL PARAGRAPH LINKING TO PREVIOUS WORK ON NAPP.  ALSO, A BIT OF HISTORIOGRAPHY?  (JSTOR?)
+
+USE META/DATE DIRECTIVE.
+
+### Jobs held by widowed women
+
+Perhaps we are interested in the sorts of jobs widowed women held.
+
+Let us first discover what the top job categories were for women in 1880,
+according to the microdata.[^fnwarning]  There are 24,655,420 women in
+NAPP's 1880a microdata.  Note: the most common listed occupation for
+women at this time was "Keeping House," which is generally categorized
+as "No occupation" by the HISCO classifications used below.
+
+	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
+	, count(*) AS Number
+	FROM data
+	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
+	WHERE sex = 2
+	GROUP BY occhisco
+	ORDER BY Number DESC
+	LIMIT 20;
+
+|JobType                           |   Number |
+|----------------------------------|----------|
+|No occupation/Unknown               | 20904850|
+|Housekeeper                         | 814863  | 
+|Servants nfs                        | 631592  | 
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow | 379871  | 
+|Labourers nfs                       | 225924  | 
+|House servants nfs and maids        | 191547  | 
+|Dressmakers                         | 160846  | 
+|Teachers (unspecified)              | 153755  | 
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk | 137277  | 
+|Washing and laundry services        | 114580  | 
+|Cooks                               | 91543   | 
+|General farmers and farmers nfs     | 87805   | 
+|Seamstresses                        | 67393   | 
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h | 47900   | 
+|Tailors and tailoresses             | 46702   | 
+|Milliners                           | 42593   | 
+|Nurses nfs                          | 33704   | 
+|Other garment makers                | 28907   | 
+|Ambiguous responses                 | 26304   | 
+|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an | 22639   | 
+
+Next, let's dig a little deeper to find out specifically about
+widows.  The variable `MARST` gives the marital status of each person
+in the data set.  Those with `MARST` = 5 are widows/widowers, so
+further limiting it by gender (`SEX` in NAPP) produces results for
+widowed women who had not remarried.  There are 1659566 widowed women
+counted in the database.
+
+	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
+	, count(*) AS Number
+	FROM data
+	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
+	WHERE sex = 2 AND marst = 5
+	GROUP BY occhisco
+	ORDER BY Number DESC
+	LIMIT 20;
+
+
+|JobType                            |  Number |
+|----------------------------------|----------|
+|No occupation/Unknown                |1211636 | 
+|Housekeeper                          |88894   | 
+|General farmers and farmers nfs      |51886   | 
+|Servants nfs                         |45089   | 
+|Washing and laundry services         |39156   | 
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow  |31754   | 
+|Labourers nfs                        |25254   | 
+|Cooks                                |20101   | 
+|Dressmakers                          |18879   | 
+|House servants nfs and maids         |15931   | 
+|Seamstresses                         |12680   | 
+|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an  |9232    | 
+|Boarding and lodging house keepers   |8550    | 
+|Nurses nfs                           |8114    | 
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk  |5690    | 
+|Teachers (unspecified)               |5362    | 
+|Tailors and tailoresses              |4955    | 
+|Milliners                            |4081    | 
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h  |3318    | 
+|Other garment makers                 |2414    | 
+
+<!--- FOOTNOTES -->
+
+[^fnwarning]: Warning: these queries will probably take a while to
+run.  Having a fast disk (such as an SSD) helps, as they are I/O
+limited, at least on my machine.
+
+<!--- LINKS -->

diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 9464b1f..ae555d3 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 [[!tag census, digital, microdata, napp, history_of_technology, sql]]
-[[!meta  date="2014-07-26"]]
+[[!meta  date="2014-07-26 11:44"]]
 
 [[Census microdata|NAPP census microdata]], such as that produced by
 the [NAPP][napp] project, can help illuminate interesting issues

added date
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 0eacd01..9464b1f 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,5 @@
 [[!tag census, digital, microdata, napp, history_of_technology, sql]]
+[[!meta  date="2014-07-26"]]
 
 [[Census microdata|NAPP census microdata]], such as that produced by
 the [NAPP][napp] project, can help illuminate interesting issues

creating tag page tags/digital__44__
diff --git a/tags/digital__44__.mdwn b/tags/digital__44__.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9220c2d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/digital__44__.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged digital,"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(digital__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

creating tag page tags/history_of_technology__44__
diff --git a/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn b/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..913a4af
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/history_of_technology__44__.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged history of technology,"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(history_of_technology__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

creating tag page tags/microdata__44__
diff --git a/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn b/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..88f6229
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/microdata__44__.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged microdata,"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(microdata__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

creating tag page tags/census__44__
diff --git a/tags/census__44__.mdwn b/tags/census__44__.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..7a071e2
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/census__44__.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged census,"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(census__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

creating tag page tags/napp__44__
diff --git a/tags/napp__44__.mdwn b/tags/napp__44__.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b704279
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/napp__44__.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged napp,"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(napp__44__)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

Removed last half-formed example, prepared to publish
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 40010e5..0eacd01 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-[[!tag draft]]
+[[!tag census, digital, microdata, napp, history_of_technology, sql]]
 
 [[Census microdata|NAPP census microdata]], such as that produced by
 the [NAPP][napp] project, can help illuminate interesting issues
@@ -114,18 +114,18 @@ those job types earned 70 years later.  However, if used carefully,
 `OCSCORUS`, like `SEIUS`, can put all workers somewhere on a universal
 scale in order to compare them. 
 
-## Some examples
+## A simple examples
 
-Let's take a look at a couple of simple examples and the SQL code
-needed to calculate them.  ([[Here's how I set up a SQLite database with
+Let's take a look at a simple example and the SQL code
+needed to calculate it.  ([[Here's how I set up a SQLite database with
 NAPP data.|napptools:_the_gory_details]])
 
 ### Where did most mining engineers live?
 
-Let's begin with a simple question: Where did mining engineers live in
+Let's begin with a straightforward question: Where did mining engineers live in
 1880?  We will use the `OCCHISCO` variable to look for them, noticing
 that the value "02700" is "Mining engineers."  Let's group them by
-state.  
+state, but notice that NAPP provides a variety of geographic levels that could be used here, from simple measures of urbanity (`URBAN`), to small divisions such as enumeration district (`ENUMDIST`) and county (`COUNTYUS`), up to regional groupings of states (`REGIONNA`).  
 
 This SQL code will produce the table below, using a JOIN to grab each
 state's name from the auxiliary table. (Note: I have manually folded
@@ -177,89 +177,6 @@ a sign that the state's [major coal industry][alacoal] had yet to
 reach substantial levels of development, or that the mines were worked
 without significant engineering oversight?
 
-### Jobs held by widowed women
-
-Perhaps we are interested in the sorts of jobs widowed women held.
-
-Let us first discover what the top job categories were for women in 1880,
-according to the microdata.[^fnwarning]  There are 24,655,420 women in
-NAPP's 1880a microdata.  Note: the most common listed occupation for
-women at this time was "Keeping House," which is generally categorized
-as "No occupation" by the HISCO classifications used below.
-
-	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
-	, count(*) AS Number
-	FROM data
-	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
-	WHERE sex = 2
-	GROUP BY occhisco
-	ORDER BY Number DESC
-	LIMIT 20;
-
-|JobType                           |   Number |
-|----------------------------------|----------|
-|No occupation/Unknown               | 20904850|
-|Housekeeper                         | 814863  | 
-|Servants nfs                        | 631592  | 
-|Farm workers, specialisation unknow | 379871  | 
-|Labourers nfs                       | 225924  | 
-|House servants nfs and maids        | 191547  | 
-|Dressmakers                         | 160846  | 
-|Teachers (unspecified)              | 153755  | 
-|Textile workers, specialisation unk | 137277  | 
-|Washing and laundry services        | 114580  | 
-|Cooks                               | 91543   | 
-|General farmers and farmers nfs     | 87805   | 
-|Seamstresses                        | 67393   | 
-|Helpers of relative or helping at h | 47900   | 
-|Tailors and tailoresses             | 46702   | 
-|Milliners                           | 42593   | 
-|Nurses nfs                          | 33704   | 
-|Other garment makers                | 28907   | 
-|Ambiguous responses                 | 26304   | 
-|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an | 22639   | 
-
-
-Next, let's dig a little deeper to find out specifically about
-widows.  The variable `MARST` gives the marital status of each person
-in the data set.  Those with `MARST` = 5 are widows/widowers, so
-further limiting it by gender (`SEX` in NAPP) produces results for
-widowed women who had not remarried.  There are 1659566 widowed women
-counted in the database.
-
-	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
-	, count(*) AS Number
-	FROM data
-	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
-	WHERE sex = 2 AND marst = 5
-	GROUP BY occhisco
-	ORDER BY Number DESC
-	LIMIT 20;
-
-
-|JobType                            |  Number |
-|----------------------------------|----------|
-|No occupation/Unknown                |1211636 | 
-|Housekeeper                          |88894   | 
-|General farmers and farmers nfs      |51886   | 
-|Servants nfs                         |45089   | 
-|Washing and laundry services         |39156   | 
-|Farm workers, specialisation unknow  |31754   | 
-|Labourers nfs                        |25254   | 
-|Cooks                                |20101   | 
-|Dressmakers                          |18879   | 
-|House servants nfs and maids         |15931   | 
-|Seamstresses                         |12680   | 
-|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an  |9232    | 
-|Boarding and lodging house keepers   |8550    | 
-|Nurses nfs                           |8114    | 
-|Textile workers, specialisation unk  |5690    | 
-|Teachers (unspecified)               |5362    | 
-|Tailors and tailoresses              |4955    | 
-|Milliners                            |4081    | 
-|Helpers of relative or helping at h  |3318    | 
-|Other garment makers                 |2414    | 
-
 ## Caveats about microdata and labor history
 
 As with any data derived from the historical manuscript census, there
@@ -362,10 +279,6 @@ in 1880 is 19.70.  By way of comparison, mining engineers (`OCCHISCO`
 from the IPUMS documentation. Note: NAPP's `SEIUS` is called `SEI` in
 the IPUMS-USA data and documentation.
 
-[^fnwarning]: Warning: these queries will probably take a while to
-run.  Having a fast disk (such as an SSD) helps, as they are I/O
-limited, at least on my machine.
-
 <!--- LINKS -->
 
 [napp]: http://www.nappdata.org

adjust headshot photo
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index 0f02055..9651f50 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 # About Me
 
-[[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=250x250]]
+[[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=270x270]]
 
 I'm Eric C. Nystrom, an Associate Professor in the History
 Department at the [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research

new headshot photo
diff --git a/about.mdwn b/about.mdwn
index a6659d6..0f02055 100644
--- a/about.mdwn
+++ b/about.mdwn
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 # About Me
 
-[[!img images/nystrom-beard.jpg align=right size=200x200]]
+[[!img images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg align=right size=250x250]]
 
 I'm Eric C. Nystrom, an Associate Professor in the History
 Department at the [Rochester Institute of Technology][RIT]. My research
diff --git a/images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg b/images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..79b98b6
Binary files /dev/null and b/images/nystrom-2014-small.jpg differ

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index fba5adb..ebf2c7f 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -9,9 +9,6 @@ margin: 2px;
 
 .align-center {
 	margin: 0 auto;
+	padding: 0px;
 }
 
-table.img {
-	margin:0px; 
-	padding: 0px;
-}
\ No newline at end of file

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 7645523..fba5adb 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -10,3 +10,8 @@ margin: 2px;
 .align-center {
 	margin: 0 auto;
 }
+
+table.img {
+	margin:0px; 
+	padding: 0px;
+}
\ No newline at end of file

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index a32b5ed..7645523 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -8,5 +8,5 @@ margin: 2px;
 } 
 
 .align-center {
-	float:center;
+	margin: 0 auto;
 }

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 4876634..a32b5ed 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -7,3 +7,6 @@ padding: -2px;
 margin: 2px;
 } 
 
+.align-center {
+	float:center;
+}

css
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index 941aeb0..ff2fed2 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 """]]
 -->
 
-[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=230x230 
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=center size=230x230 
 alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" 
 caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</i> (2014)"]]
 

css
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index 4abc9fd..941aeb0 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 """]]
 -->
 
-[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=right size=250x250 
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=230x230 
 alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" 
 caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</i> (2014)"]]
 

css
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index 82bd7a9..4abc9fd 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -4,8 +4,9 @@
 """]]
 -->
 
-[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=right size=200x200 
-alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" ]]
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=right size=250x250 
+alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" 
+caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</i> (2014)"]]
 
 [[About Me|about]]
 

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index d918062..4876634 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -4,6 +4,6 @@ background-color: #9eaab8;
 
 img {
 padding: -2px;
-margin: 10px;
+margin: 2px;
 } 
 
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index 3141a5b..82bd7a9 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 """]]
 -->
 
-[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=center size=200x200 
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=right size=200x200 
 alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" ]]
 
 [[About Me|about]]

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 6ebfef4..d918062 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -4,11 +4,6 @@ background-color: #9eaab8;
 
 img {
 padding: -2px;
-margin: 4px;
+margin: 10px;
 } 
 
-.img align-center {
-	padding: 0px;
-	border: 7px;
-	text-align:center;	
-}
\ No newline at end of file

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 609c227..6ebfef4 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -5,6 +5,10 @@ background-color: #9eaab8;
 img {
 padding: -2px;
 margin: 4px;
-#
 } 
 
+.img align-center {
+	padding: 0px;
+	border: 7px;
+	text-align:center;	
+}
\ No newline at end of file

css
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index ebea022..3141a5b 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -5,8 +5,7 @@
 -->
 
 [[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=center size=200x200 
-alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" 
-caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models and Mining Engineering in America</i> (2014)"]]
+alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" ]]
 
 [[About Me|about]]
 

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 884315d..609c227 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -3,7 +3,8 @@ background-color: #9eaab8;
 }
 
 img {
-padding: 0px;
+padding: -2px;
+margin: 4px;
 #
 } 
 

css
diff --git a/local.css b/local.css
index 02748dd..884315d 100644
--- a/local.css
+++ b/local.css
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ background-color: #9eaab8;
 }
 
 img {
-padding: 7px;
+padding: 0px;
+#
 } 
 

book cover in sidebar
diff --git a/images/seeing-underground-cover-small.jpg b/images/seeing-underground-cover-small.jpg
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0accac1
Binary files /dev/null and b/images/seeing-underground-cover-small.jpg differ
diff --git a/sidebar.mdwn b/sidebar.mdwn
index 9831dcd..ebea022 100644
--- a/sidebar.mdwn
+++ b/sidebar.mdwn
@@ -4,6 +4,10 @@
 """]]
 -->
 
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg align=center size=200x200 
+alt="Seeing Underground book cover" link="http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS" 
+caption="<i>Seeing Underground: Maps, Models and Mining Engineering in America</i> (2014)"]]
+
 [[About Me|about]]
 
 [[CV]]

Added amazon shortlink for my book
diff --git a/amazon.mdwn b/amazon.mdwn
index 74e063a..667c0ee 100644
--- a/amazon.mdwn
+++ b/amazon.mdwn
@@ -4,10 +4,12 @@
 
 My book: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=ercnyphd-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0874179327"
 
+Book shortlink: <http://amzn.to/1fQzLXS>
+
 Gretchen:  <http://wittygourmet.com/amazon/>
 
 ## Linode
 
 Linode is a Linux Virtual Private Server host.  They do excellent work, as far as I am concerned.
 
-<https://www.linode.com/?r=01df64662d83160f029c4b041b8af2b2b7228aac>
\ No newline at end of file
+<https://www.linode.com/?r=01df64662d83160f029c4b041b8af2b2b7228aac>

add MHA Council, SBAH Board, book link
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 59973a3..a85b05a 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ University
 
 ## Selected Publications
 
-- _Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._ (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014) [Book details](http://www.unpress.nevada.edu/NewForthcoming/Titles/Seeing%20Underground;2273?3)
+- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">_Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._ </a>(Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014).
 
 - "'Brilliant Contingency of Legal Talent and Mining Experts': A
   Tonopah Apex Lawsuit, 1914-1918," _Nevada Historical Society
@@ -63,17 +63,17 @@ University
 - [Organization of American Historians][oah]
 
 I have served as editor of the [_Mining History News_][newsletter],
-the quarterly newsletter of the Mining History Association, since
-2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter.
+the quarterly newsletter of the [Mining History Association][mha], since
+2007.  Please email me if you have an item for the newsletter. I am also a Council Member (2014--) and serve on the MHA's Grants Committee.
 
-Since 2009, I have been Vice-Chair of TEMSIG, the Technology and
+Since 2009, I have been Vice-Chair of [TEMSIG][temsig], the Technology and
 Museums Special Interest Group of the [Society for the History of
-Technology][shot].  Among other duites, I am keeper of the listserv,
+Technology][shot].  Among other duties, I am keeper of the listserv,
 so if you are interested in joining TEMSIG, please contact me.
 
 I have been an active member of the Collections and Education
 Committee of the [National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House][sbah]
-since 2008.  This small, professional museum preserves and interprets
+since 2008, and joined the Board of Trustees in 2014. This small, professional museum preserves and interprets
 the longtime Rochester, NY home of famed equal rights advocate Susan
 B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 
@@ -84,3 +84,4 @@ B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 [newsletter]: http://www.mininghistoryassociation.org/news.htm
 [sbah]: http://susanbanthonyhouse.org
 [9chris]: http://9chris.org
+[temsig]: http://www.temsig.org

creating tag page tags/mine_maps
diff --git a/tags/mine_maps.mdwn b/tags/mine_maps.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9241596
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/mine_maps.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged mine maps"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(mine_maps)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

creating tag page tags/models
diff --git a/tags/models.mdwn b/tags/models.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0dd9218
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/models.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged models"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(models)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]

add tags and post
diff --git a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
index 2db4dee..c02d872 100644
--- a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-[[!tag draft]]
+[[!tag history_of_technology mining_history mine_maps models]]
 
 [[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=500x500 align=right link="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20" alt="Cover image of Seeing Underground" ]]
 

image link to amazon
diff --git a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
index d3565dd..2db4dee 100644
--- a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
 [[!tag draft]]
 
-[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=500x500 align=right alt="Cover image of Seeing Underground" ]]
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=500x500 align=right link="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20" alt="Cover image of Seeing Underground" ]]
 
-It's finally here!  <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a>, published by the [University of Nevada Press][su-unpress], is available in hardcover and kindle editions. I examine how maps and models created a visual culture of mining engineering, helping American mining engineers fashion a professional identity and professional opportunities for themselves. 
+It's finally here!  <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a>, published by the [University of Nevada Press][su-unpress], is available in hardcover and kindle editions. I examine how maps and models created a visual culture of mining engineering, helping American mining engineers fashion a professional identity and occupational opportunities for themselves. 
 
 I'm grateful for all the support and assistance I've received as I've chased this fascinating history.
 

edits
diff --git a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
index 007732d..d3565dd 100644
--- a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
@@ -2,7 +2,9 @@
 
 [[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=500x500 align=right alt="Cover image of Seeing Underground" ]]
 
-It's finally here!  <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a>, published by the [University of Nevada Press][su-unpress], is available in hardcover and kindle editions.
+It's finally here!  <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a>, published by the [University of Nevada Press][su-unpress], is available in hardcover and kindle editions. I examine how maps and models created a visual culture of mining engineering, helping American mining engineers fashion a professional identity and professional opportunities for themselves. 
+
+I'm grateful for all the support and assistance I've received as I've chased this fascinating history.
 
 Here's the description from the press:
 

draft of post
diff --git a/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..007732d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Seeing_Underground__44___a_book_announcement.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,15 @@
+[[!tag draft]]
+
+[[!img images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg size=500x500 align=right alt="Cover image of Seeing Underground" ]]
+
+It's finally here!  <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a>, published by the [University of Nevada Press][su-unpress], is available in hardcover and kindle editions.
+
+Here's the description from the press:
+
+Digging mineral wealth from the ground dates to prehistoric times, and Europeans pursued mining in the Americas from the earliest colonial days. Prior to the Civil War, little mining was deep enough to require maps. However, the major finds of the mid-nineteenth century, such as the Comstock Lode, were vastly larger than any before in America. In *Seeing Underground*, Nystrom argues that, as industrial mining came of age in the United States, the development of maps and models gave power to a new visual culture and allowed mining engineers to advance their profession, gaining authority over mining operations from the miners themselves.
+
+Starting in the late nineteenth century, mining engineers developed a new set of practices, artifacts, and discourses to visualize complex, pitch-dark three-dimensional spaces. These maps and models became necessary tools in creating and controlling those spaces. They made mining more understandable, predictable, and profitable. Nystrom shows that this new visual culture was crucial to specific developments in American mining, such as implementing new safety regulations after the Avondale, Pennsylvania, fire of 1869 killed 110 men and boys; understanding complex geology, as in the rich ores of Butte, Montana; and settling high-stakes litigation, such as the Tonopah, Nevada, *Jim Butler v. West End* lawsuit, which reached the US Supreme Court.
+
+Nystrom demonstrates that these neglected artifacts of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have much to teach us today. The development of a visual culture helped create a new professional class of mining engineers and changed how mining was done.
+
+[su-unpress]: http://www.unpress.nevada.edu/Browse/Titles/Seeing%20Underground;2273?PHPSESSID=ed24ed99ef53e4e701753d37ea5d9693

cover image, seeing underground
diff --git a/images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg b/images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..786906d
Binary files /dev/null and b/images/seeing-underground-cover.jpg differ

fix url
diff --git a/amazon.mdwn b/amazon.mdwn
index 53b9389..74e063a 100644
--- a/amazon.mdwn
+++ b/amazon.mdwn
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 
 My book: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=ercnyphd-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0874179327"
 
-Gretchen:  http://wittygourmet.com/amazon/
+Gretchen:  <http://wittygourmet.com/amazon/>
 
 ## Linode
 

add page of affiliate links
diff --git a/amazon.mdwn b/amazon.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..53b9389
--- /dev/null
+++ b/amazon.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+# Affliate Links
+
+## Amazon
+
+My book: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0874179327/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0874179327&linkCode=as2&tag=ercnyphd-20">Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America</a><img src="http://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=ercnyphd-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0874179327"
+
+Gretchen:  http://wittygourmet.com/amazon/
+
+## Linode
+
+Linode is a Linux Virtual Private Server host.  They do excellent work, as far as I am concerned.
+
+<https://www.linode.com/?r=01df64662d83160f029c4b041b8af2b2b7228aac>
\ No newline at end of file

further revision of post
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 2546887..40010e5 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -196,27 +196,27 @@ as "No occupation" by the HISCO classifications used below.
 	ORDER BY Number DESC
 	LIMIT 20;
 
-|JobType                           |   Number |   
+|JobType                           |   Number |
 |----------------------------------|----------|
-|No occupation/Unknown               | 20904850|  
-|Housekeeper                         | 814863  |  
-|Servants nfs                        | 631592  |  
-|Farm workers, specialisation unknow | 379871  |  
-|Labourers nfs                       | 225924  |  
-|House servants nfs and maids        | 191547  |  
-|Dressmakers                         | 160846  |  
-|Teachers (unspecified)              | 153755  |  
-|Textile workers, specialisation unk | 137277  |  
-|Washing and laundry services        | 114580  |  
-|Cooks                               | 91543   |  
-|General farmers and farmers nfs     | 87805   |  
-|Seamstresses                        | 67393   |  
-|Helpers of relative or helping at h | 47900   |  
-|Tailors and tailoresses             | 46702   |  
-|Milliners                           | 42593   |  
-|Nurses nfs                          | 33704   |  
-|Other garment makers                | 28907   |  
-|Ambiguous responses                 | 26304   |  
+|No occupation/Unknown               | 20904850|
+|Housekeeper                         | 814863  | 
+|Servants nfs                        | 631592  | 
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow | 379871  | 
+|Labourers nfs                       | 225924  | 
+|House servants nfs and maids        | 191547  | 
+|Dressmakers                         | 160846  | 
+|Teachers (unspecified)              | 153755  | 
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk | 137277  | 
+|Washing and laundry services        | 114580  | 
+|Cooks                               | 91543   | 
+|General farmers and farmers nfs     | 87805   | 
+|Seamstresses                        | 67393   | 
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h | 47900   | 
+|Tailors and tailoresses             | 46702   | 
+|Milliners                           | 42593   | 
+|Nurses nfs                          | 33704   | 
+|Other garment makers                | 28907   | 
+|Ambiguous responses                 | 26304   | 
 |Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an | 22639   | 
 
 
@@ -239,25 +239,25 @@ counted in the database.
 
 |JobType                            |  Number |
 |----------------------------------|----------|
-|No occupation/Unknown                |1211636 |  
-|Housekeeper                          |88894   |  
-|General farmers and farmers nfs      |51886   |  
-|Servants nfs                         |45089   |  
-|Washing and laundry services         |39156   |  
-|Farm workers, specialisation unknow  |31754   |  
-|Labourers nfs                        |25254   |  
-|Cooks                                |20101   |  
-|Dressmakers                          |18879   |  
-|House servants nfs and maids         |15931   |  
-|Seamstresses                         |12680   |  
-|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an  |9232    |  
-|Boarding and lodging house keepers   |8550    |  
-|Nurses nfs                           |8114    |  
-|Textile workers, specialisation unk  |5690    |  
-|Teachers (unspecified)               |5362    |  
-|Tailors and tailoresses              |4955    |  
-|Milliners                            |4081    |  
-|Helpers of relative or helping at h  |3318    |  
+|No occupation/Unknown                |1211636 | 
+|Housekeeper                          |88894   | 
+|General farmers and farmers nfs      |51886   | 
+|Servants nfs                         |45089   | 
+|Washing and laundry services         |39156   | 
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow  |31754   | 
+|Labourers nfs                        |25254   | 
+|Cooks                                |20101   | 
+|Dressmakers                          |18879   | 
+|House servants nfs and maids         |15931   | 
+|Seamstresses                         |12680   | 
+|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an  |9232    | 
+|Boarding and lodging house keepers   |8550    | 
+|Nurses nfs                           |8114    | 
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk  |5690    | 
+|Teachers (unspecified)               |5362    | 
+|Tailors and tailoresses              |4955    | 
+|Milliners                            |4081    | 
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h  |3318    | 
 |Other garment makers                 |2414    | 
 
 ## Caveats about microdata and labor history
@@ -362,7 +362,7 @@ in 1880 is 19.70.  By way of comparison, mining engineers (`OCCHISCO`
 from the IPUMS documentation. Note: NAPP's `SEIUS` is called `SEI` in
 the IPUMS-USA data and documentation.
 
-[^fnwarning] Warning: these queries will probably take a while to
+[^fnwarning]: Warning: these queries will probably take a while to
 run.  Having a fast disk (such as an SSD) helps, as they are I/O
 limited, at least on my machine.
 

further revision of post
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 2fc1f53..2546887 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -125,8 +125,11 @@ NAPP data.|napptools:_the_gory_details]])
 Let's begin with a simple question: Where did mining engineers live in
 1880?  We will use the `OCCHISCO` variable to look for them, noticing
 that the value "02700" is "Mining engineers."  Let's group them by
-state.  (Note: in the results below, I have manually folded the table
-to take up less vertical space.)
+state.  
+
+This SQL code will produce the table below, using a JOIN to grab each
+state's name from the auxiliary table. (Note: I have manually folded
+the table to take up less vertical space.)
 
 	SELECT stateus.desc AS State
 	, count(*) AS Engineers
@@ -160,6 +163,103 @@ to take up less vertical space.)
 | North Dakota      |   1 | Oregon               |  1 |
 | Wyoming Territory |   1 |                      |    |
 
+Unsurprisingly, many mining engineers were found in the American West,
+where mining was booming.  The strong numbers in Pennsylvania reflect
+the importance of the anthracite and bituminous coal industry
+there. But these numbers can also help remind us of the close association of
+engineering expertise with capital, as in the case of those located in
+New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts.  Similarly, they might help
+remind a researcher who focuses on Western mining of the growing
+importance of coal production in the midwest, in states such as Ohio,
+Illinois, and Iowa.  Unexpectedly high or low numbers can help prompt
+deeper investigation.  For instance, are two mere engineers in Alabama
+a sign that the state's [major coal industry][alacoal] had yet to
+reach substantial levels of development, or that the mines were worked
+without significant engineering oversight?
+
+### Jobs held by widowed women
+
+Perhaps we are interested in the sorts of jobs widowed women held.
+
+Let us first discover what the top job categories were for women in 1880,
+according to the microdata.[^fnwarning]  There are 24,655,420 women in
+NAPP's 1880a microdata.  Note: the most common listed occupation for
+women at this time was "Keeping House," which is generally categorized
+as "No occupation" by the HISCO classifications used below.
+
+	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
+	, count(*) AS Number
+	FROM data
+	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
+	WHERE sex = 2
+	GROUP BY occhisco
+	ORDER BY Number DESC
+	LIMIT 20;
+
+|JobType                           |   Number |   
+|----------------------------------|----------|
+|No occupation/Unknown               | 20904850|  
+|Housekeeper                         | 814863  |  
+|Servants nfs                        | 631592  |  
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow | 379871  |  
+|Labourers nfs                       | 225924  |  
+|House servants nfs and maids        | 191547  |  
+|Dressmakers                         | 160846  |  
+|Teachers (unspecified)              | 153755  |  
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk | 137277  |  
+|Washing and laundry services        | 114580  |  
+|Cooks                               | 91543   |  
+|General farmers and farmers nfs     | 87805   |  
+|Seamstresses                        | 67393   |  
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h | 47900   |  
+|Tailors and tailoresses             | 46702   |  
+|Milliners                           | 42593   |  
+|Nurses nfs                          | 33704   |  
+|Other garment makers                | 28907   |  
+|Ambiguous responses                 | 26304   |  
+|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an | 22639   | 
+
+
+Next, let's dig a little deeper to find out specifically about
+widows.  The variable `MARST` gives the marital status of each person
+in the data set.  Those with `MARST` = 5 are widows/widowers, so
+further limiting it by gender (`SEX` in NAPP) produces results for
+widowed women who had not remarried.  There are 1659566 widowed women
+counted in the database.
+
+	SELECT occhisco.desc AS JobType
+	, count(*) AS Number
+	FROM data
+	JOIN occhisco ON data.occhisco = occhisco.id
+	WHERE sex = 2 AND marst = 5
+	GROUP BY occhisco
+	ORDER BY Number DESC
+	LIMIT 20;
+
+
+|JobType                            |  Number |
+|----------------------------------|----------|
+|No occupation/Unknown                |1211636 |  
+|Housekeeper                          |88894   |  
+|General farmers and farmers nfs      |51886   |  
+|Servants nfs                         |45089   |  
+|Washing and laundry services         |39156   |  
+|Farm workers, specialisation unknow  |31754   |  
+|Labourers nfs                        |25254   |  
+|Cooks                                |20101   |  
+|Dressmakers                          |18879   |  
+|House servants nfs and maids         |15931   |  
+|Seamstresses                         |12680   |  
+|Dealer, merchant etc. (Wholesale an  |9232    |  
+|Boarding and lodging house keepers   |8550    |  
+|Nurses nfs                           |8114    |  
+|Textile workers, specialisation unk  |5690    |  
+|Teachers (unspecified)               |5362    |  
+|Tailors and tailoresses              |4955    |  
+|Milliners                            |4081    |  
+|Helpers of relative or helping at h  |3318    |  
+|Other garment makers                 |2414    | 
+
 ## Caveats about microdata and labor history
 
 As with any data derived from the historical manuscript census, there
@@ -262,6 +362,10 @@ in 1880 is 19.70.  By way of comparison, mining engineers (`OCCHISCO`
 from the IPUMS documentation. Note: NAPP's `SEIUS` is called `SEI` in
 the IPUMS-USA data and documentation.
 
+[^fnwarning] Warning: these queries will probably take a while to
+run.  Having a fast disk (such as an SSD) helps, as they are I/O
+limited, at least on my machine.
+
 <!--- LINKS -->
 
 [napp]: http://www.nappdata.org
@@ -273,3 +377,4 @@ the IPUMS-USA data and documentation.
 [ocstatus]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCSTATUS#description_section
 [seius]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/SEIUS#description_section
 [ocscorus]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCSCORUS#description_section
+[alacoal]: http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1473

Update of post
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
index 928106b..2fc1f53 100644
--- a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -91,11 +91,74 @@ category, a "Laborer" would have `OCSTATUS` 33, where the
 miner might have an `OCSTATUS` of 32 ("Worker or works in"), 00
 ("None"), or 99 ("Unknown").
 
-SEIUS, OCSCORUS
+NAPP also includes constructed variables that suggest, in a relative
+way, the wealth or status associated with an occupation.
+[`SEIUS`][seius] uses the "Duncan Socioeconomic Index," which was
+developed in the 1950s, to create an occupational rank that considers
+income, education, and prestige.  These scores are tied to the way
+those facotrs were perceived in the 1950s -- this means that they can
+be compared across decades, as the scores will always be the same for
+a given occupation; but it also anachronistically frames prestige in
+1950 terms.  For example, a "miner" receives a `SEIUS` score of 10,
+which is fairly low.[^fnsei]  But perhaps mining carried more prestige
+in 1880?  For obvious reasons, there is considerable debate about the
+usefulness of this measure, but like all of these constructed
+variables, it may be helpful if used carefully.[^fnseicaveat] The NAPP
+variable `OCSCORUS` provides a related measurement, classifying each
+occupation according to its economic status in 1950.  Unlike the
+`SEIUS` score, which factored prestige or status of an occupation into
+its calculations, the `OCSCORUS` is based only on the earning power of
+that job classification in 1950.  As with `SEIUS`, there are obvious
+problems with anachronistically comparing 1880 job types based on what
+those job types earned 70 years later.  However, if used carefully,
+`OCSCORUS`, like `SEIUS`, can put all workers somewhere on a universal
+scale in order to compare them. 
 
+## Some examples
 
+Let's take a look at a couple of simple examples and the SQL code
+needed to calculate them.  ([[Here's how I set up a SQLite database with
+NAPP data.|napptools:_the_gory_details]])
 
-## Some examples
+### Where did most mining engineers live?
+
+Let's begin with a simple question: Where did mining engineers live in
+1880?  We will use the `OCCHISCO` variable to look for them, noticing
+that the value "02700" is "Mining engineers."  Let's group them by
+state.  (Note: in the results below, I have manually folded the table
+to take up less vertical space.)
+
+	SELECT stateus.desc AS State
+	, count(*) AS Engineers
+	FROM data
+	JOIN stateus ON data.stateus = stateus.id
+	WHERE occhisco = 2700
+	GROUP BY State
+	ORDER BY Engineers DESC
+	;
+
+| State | Engineers | State | Engineers |
+|--------------|-------|-------|-------|
+| California        | 146 | Colorado             | 83 |
+| Pennsylvania      |  66 | New York             | 57 |
+| Michigan          |  24 | West Virginia        | 23 |
+| Arizona Territory |  22 | Illinois             | 20 |
+| Nevada            |  20 | Massachusetts        | 17 |
+| Utah Territory    |  17 | Missouri             | 14 |
+| New Jersey        |  14 | Ohio                 | 10 |
+| New Mexico        |   9 | Virginia             |  8 |
+| Idaho Territory   |   7 | Montana Territory    |  7 |
+| North Carolina    |   7 | Iowa                 |  6 |
+| Georgia           |   5 | District of Columbia |  4 |
+| New Hampshire     |   4 | Tennessee            |  4 |
+| Arkansas          |   3 | Connecticut          |  3 |
+| Kentucky          |   3 | Maine                |  3 |
+| South Dakota      |   3 | Alabama              |  2 |
+| Indiana           |   2 | Maryland             |  2 |
+| Rhode Island      |   2 | South Carolina       |  2 |
+| Delaware          |   1 | Nebraska             |  1 |
+| North Dakota      |   1 | Oregon               |  1 |
+| Wyoming Territory |   1 |                      |    |
 
 ## Caveats about microdata and labor history
 
@@ -144,7 +207,16 @@ unemployment had been deemed unnecessary to record by genealogist
 volunteers who, in some cases, originally compiled the data sets that
 were further extended by NAPP.)
 
-<--- FOOTNOTES --->
+## Conclusion
+
+NAPP microdata derived from the census can offer important
+information about historic patterns of work and labor.  The data is by
+no means a perfect representation of work activity, and it can contain
+noteworthy errors.  Even so, when used judiciously, this microdata can
+shed light on important questions about work that were central to life
+in the past.
+
+<!--- FOOTNOTES -->
 
 [^fnten]: Some quick work with the database shows that this rule was
 hardly observed universally.  While sometimes enumerators filled this
@@ -181,7 +253,16 @@ because of the need to classify occupations they ended up in the same
 [^fnnorway]: Among NAPP data sets, Norway is an exception, and allowed
 census takers to record two occupations.
 
-<--- LINKS --->
+[^fnsei]: The average `SEIUS` value for all members of the labor force
+in 1880 is 19.70.  By way of comparison, mining engineers (`OCCHISCO`
+= 02700) have an `SEIUS` score of 85.
+
+[^fnseicaveat]: See
+[this cautionary note](https://usa.ipums.org/usa/chapter4/sei_note.shtml)
+from the IPUMS documentation. Note: NAPP's `SEIUS` is called `SEI` in
+the IPUMS-USA data and documentation.
+
+<!--- LINKS -->
 
 [napp]: http://www.nappdata.org
 [1880form]: http://www.census.gov/history/pdf/1880_questionnaire.pdf
@@ -190,3 +271,5 @@ census takers to record two occupations.
 [occhisco]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCCHISCO#description_section
 [occ50us]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCC50US#description_section
 [ocstatus]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCSTATUS#description_section
+[seius]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/SEIUS#description_section
+[ocscorus]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCSCORUS#description_section

Draft of work in NAPP microdata post
diff --git a/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..928106b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/posts/Exploring_work_with_NAPP_microdata.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,192 @@
+[[!tag draft]]
+
+[[Census microdata|NAPP census microdata]], such as that produced by
+the [NAPP][napp] project, can help illuminate interesting issues
+surrounding work and labor.
+
+Investigating the history of work using microdata must begin with the
+questions asked by the census enumerators about employment.  These
+varied depending on the country and year, but were generally quite
+simple.  For example, the [U.S. 1880 census form][1880form] had two
+questions pertaining to work, and a third that hinted toward labor as
+well.  Question 13 recorded the "Profession, Occupation, or Trade of
+each person, male or female," and Question 14 asked the "Number of
+months this person has been unemployed during the Census year."  These
+two questions were not supposed to be asked of any individual "under
+10 years of age," according to the instructions.[^fnten] Question 15 also
+implied work, asking if the person had been sick or disabled, "so as
+to be unable to attend to ordinary business or duties." The recorded
+occupation, Question 13 in the case of the US 1880 census, was written
+free-form in the blank.
+
+## Transcribing the occupation
+
+In the NAPP dataset, the occupation as it was transcribed by
+volunteers is found in the field `OCCSTRNG`.  The small space on the
+form and the frequently creative spelling and abbreviating style of
+the enumerators can lead to some unreliable results if taken alone.
+
+Let's look at mining engineers in the 1880 US microdata as produced by
+NAPP.  We have 417 entries where `OCCSTRNG` is `MINING ENGINEER`.
+Good!  But we also have other variations, such as:
+
+|--------|-------|--------|
+| MINING ENGINEAR | MINING ENGERNEER | MINING ENG. |
+| MINGING ENGINEER | MG. ENGINEER | ENGINEER MINING |
+| MINING ENGR | MINING EXPERT | MININING ENGINEER |
+
+Some of these might be small variations on the overall category, worth
+noting and investigating.  (What's the difference, in 1880, between a
+`Mining Expert` and a `Mining Engineer`?)  But many are clearly mining
+engineers, just spelled differently.
+
+While this variable by itself is valuable, it can be difficult even
+for simple operations -- say, counting the number of mining engineers
+in a particular state -- because of the spelling differences.  To
+address this limitation, the NAPP team created many additional
+variables to allow researchers to compare occupational information
+more broadly.
+
+## Constructing variables about work
+
+From these tiny bits of inconsistent information about each person's
+occupation, NAPP adds tremendous value by creating new variables
+derived from this information.  These are "constructed variables."
+
+[As you can see in the full list][nappworkvariables], not all
+variables are available for each sample, in part because the census
+questions asked about labor could vary depending on country and year.
+Additionally, some of the variables have essentially similar
+information, but NAPP offers a variety in order to make it easier to
+connect NAPP data with other data sets.
+
+Some of these constructed variables are simple and intended to help
+with other comparisons. For example, the `LABFORCE` variable
+simply records if a person participated in the work force or not (or
+if it was impossible to tell).[^fnlabforce] By itself, this might not
+seem very useful, but it could be helpful in conjunction with other
+variables.  For example, you might want to compare people in one
+occupational sub-group -- farmers, for example -- with all people who
+were a part of the *labor force* rather than the public as a whole.
+
+Other constructed variables group together workers by their
+occupation.  This helps solve the sort of problem we faced above with
+misspellings of "mining engineer." [`OCCHISCO`][occhisco] and
+[`OCC50US`][occ50us] are two of these variables.  Each uses a
+mid-twentieth century list of occupations as a starting point, with
+adaptations to better represent historical occupations. It is
+important to remember that not all occupations would have fit neatly
+into one of these later occupational categories, and conversely,
+sometimes very different occupations get lumped together
+inadvertently.[^fnsurveyor] Even so, this can be an important way to
+identify relatively fire-grained occupational information.
+
+Some occupations have a built-in hierarchy of status that might be
+difficult to capture using the `OCCHISCO` codes alone.  A "Mine
+Laborer" and a "Miner" are different things, but both might reasonably
+belong in `OCCHISCO` category 71120. The [`OCSTATUS`][ocstatus] variable records
+any known hierarchical information from the occupation field.  So
+while a miner and a mine laborer would both be in the same `OCCHISCO`
+category, a "Laborer" would have `OCSTATUS` 33, where the
+miner might have an `OCSTATUS` of 32 ("Worker or works in"), 00
+("None"), or 99 ("Unknown").
+
+SEIUS, OCSCORUS
+
+
+
+## Some examples
+
+## Caveats about microdata and labor history
+
+As with any data derived from the historical manuscript census, there
+are sometimes problems with NAPP's occupational data.  Some of these
+problems arise from the recording, transcription, and coding phases.
+If the enumerator heard the person incorrectly (or could not spell
+well), or if a volunteer could not make out the handwriting or assumed
+the word was a different one, or if the occupation did not clearly fit
+any one category and a "best guess" had to be made in classification,
+errors might be introduced.  It might be particularly troublesome to
+imagine that job categories, and their relative status, remained
+consistent over the decades.
+
+Other issues stem from the nature of the census itself.  Most census
+forms only permitted one occupation to be listed.[^fnnorway]
+Occasionally enumerators tried to squeeze two occupations in the
+space, such as "MINING & CIVIL ENGINEER." But most frequently the
+other work was simply not counted.  What if a person was a farmer
+during the summer months and worked at mining during the winter?  Only
+one occupation could be recorded.
+
+Census workers were supposed to record a person where they were found
+on a particular day or month, such as June 1880.  This specificity
+could contribute to errors in recording people whose work was seasonal
+or took them far from home, such as a mining engineer on a summer-long
+consulting trip in the mountains of the American West.
+
+Similarly, the census takers did a poor job understanding and
+accounting for the work of women and children.  A woman who took in
+boarders or washing made a tangible contribution to her household's
+economic prosperity, but this was often overlooked by enumerators
+who would frequently simply record "Keeping House."
+
+Job insecurity is difficult to determine in the NAPP data.  It was not
+well recorded by the census, especially in older censuses, which
+provide only crude measures of unemployment and no data at all about
+underemployment.  In the 1880 US census, for example, there is a
+column to mark how many months a person has been unemployed, but this
+could at best unevenly reflect the cycle of on-again, off-again work
+that typified many labor categories, such as anthracite miners in
+Pennsylvania. Compounding the issue, most of the NAPP data sets do not
+include this information, even if it had originally been recorded on
+the census. (Perhaps a potentially-sensitive issue such as
+unemployment had been deemed unnecessary to record by genealogist
+volunteers who, in some cases, originally compiled the data sets that
+were further extended by NAPP.)
+
+<--- FOOTNOTES --->
+
+[^fnten]: Some quick work with the database shows that this rule was
+hardly observed universally.  While sometimes enumerators filled this
+field with age-appropriate information such as "ATTENDING SCHOOL," or
+crossed it out with an "X," (and typos in the age field may also have
+occurred), it is clear that children under 10 years of age worked in
+small numbers in a wide variety of occupations in 1880.
+
+[^fnlabforce]: As usual, caveats apply and the
+[documentation for each variable must be read carefully][labforce].
+For example, the `LABFORCE` variable is designed so as to report that
+people who are listed as having an occupation, but are 15 years old or
+younger, are automatically reported as *not* having an occupation.
+This would make it impossible to use `LABFORCE` to pursue certain
+kinds of occupational questions about child labor, for example.
+
+[^fnsurveyor]: One example of inadvertent lumping of dissimilar work
+in the same category can be found in `OCCHISCO` value 03030, "Mine
+surveyors." In the 1880a US data set, only 15 individuals are placed
+in this category.  With occupations such as "MINE SURVEYOR" (3),
+"MINING SURVEYOR" (2), and "SURVEYOR AND MINER" (1), some of these
+appear to be people who work for mining companies conducting
+underground surveying, which was often done by beginning-level mining
+engineers.  Others in this category, such as "U.S. MIN'L SURVEYOR" (1)
+and "U.S. DEPUTY MINER SURV." (1) are quite different.  These were
+experienced land surveyors appointed by the federal government to
+carefully survey the surface boundaries of any mining claim staked on
+public land.  They would create reports and plat maps, swearing under
+oath as to their accuracy.  US Mineral Surveyors, then, would seem to
+be a very different type of occupation than a mine surveyor, but
+because of the need to classify occupations they ended up in the same
+`OCCHISCO` category.
+
+[^fnnorway]: Among NAPP data sets, Norway is an exception, and allowed
+census takers to record two occupations.
+
+<--- LINKS --->
+
+[napp]: http://www.nappdata.org
+[1880form]: http://www.census.gov/history/pdf/1880_questionnaire.pdf
+[nappworkvariables]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/group/work
+[labforce]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/LABFORCE#description_section
+[occhisco]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCCHISCO#description_section
+[occ50us]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCC50US#description_section
+[ocstatus]: https://www.nappdata.org/napp-action/variables/OCSTATUS#description_section

Added URL for book, fixed title
diff --git a/cv.mdwn b/cv.mdwn
index 04ef5fb..59973a3 100644
--- a/cv.mdwn
+++ b/cv.mdwn
@@ -7,9 +7,7 @@ University
 
 ## Selected Publications
 
-- _Seeing Underground: The Visual Culture of American Mining
-  Engineering, 1860-1920._ (Reno: University of Nevada Press)
-  [accepted for publication, forthcoming spring 2014]
+- _Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America._ (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2014) [Book details](http://www.unpress.nevada.edu/NewForthcoming/Titles/Seeing%20Underground;2273?3)
 
 - "'Brilliant Contingency of Legal Talent and Mining Experts': A
   Tonopah Apex Lawsuit, 1914-1918," _Nevada Historical Society
@@ -85,4 +83,4 @@ B. Anthony.  The house itself is a National Historic Landmark.
 [mha]: http://www.mininghistoryassociation.org
 [newsletter]: http://www.mininghistoryassociation.org/news.htm
 [sbah]: http://susanbanthonyhouse.org
-[9chris]: http://9chris.org
\ No newline at end of file
+[9chris]: http://9chris.org

creating tag page tags/microdata
diff --git a/tags/microdata.mdwn b/tags/microdata.mdwn
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0ab03a1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/tags/microdata.mdwn
@@ -0,0 +1,4 @@
+[[!meta title="pages tagged microdata"]]
+
+[[!inline pages="tagged(microdata)" actions="no" archive="yes"
+feedshow=10]]